Discussion:
Poldark
(too old to reply)
Howard Duck
2017-06-14 03:12:11 UTC
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Here is another 18th century drama (thinking of Outlander series).
Amazon Prime has 2 of the 4 seasons of the 2015+ version indicated by
IMDb. It seems to be based on a novel by Winston Graham. We have
watched the 18 episodes available. Quite interesting. This is
Masterpiece Theater aired on PBS originally. There is a 1975 version
available on Acorn TV. I guess we'll watch it also.

Howard Duck
Nyssa
2017-06-14 15:02:33 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Here is another 18th century drama (thinking of Outlander
series). Amazon Prime has 2 of the 4 seasons of the 2015+
version indicated by
IMDb. It seems to be based on a novel by Winston Graham.
We have
watched the 18 episodes available. Quite interesting.
This is
Masterpiece Theater aired on PBS originally. There is a
1975 version
available on Acorn TV. I guess we'll watch it also.
Howard Duck
There is a whole series of novels featuring the Poldarks.

Never saw the newer version, but I've got the original one
on DVDs. Plus I've got all the novels that go well beyond
what's covered in the series.

Not a mystery, but for another good period drama, look for
"The Onedin Line." There is also a series of books by Cyril
Abraham that go along with the series.

Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the first
in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Howard Duck
2017-06-14 18:55:27 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
There is a whole series of novels featuring the Poldarks.
Never saw the newer version, but I've got the original one
on DVDs. Plus I've got all the novels that go well beyond
what's covered in the series.
Not a mystery, but for another good period drama, look for
"The Onedin Line." There is also a series of books by Cyril
Abraham that go along with the series.
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the first
in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
We have just started the 1975 version of Poldark. What a contrast to
the 2015 version in cinematic style and acting, and even casting. Now
here is a real study in the difference between method acting and
theatrical acting.

Thanks for the tip, Nyssa.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-15 13:15:12 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 11:02:33 -0400, Nyssa
Post by Nyssa
There is a whole series of novels featuring the Poldarks.
Never saw the newer version, but I've got the original one
on DVDs. Plus I've got all the novels that go well beyond
what's covered in the series.
Not a mystery, but for another good period drama, look for
"The Onedin Line." There is also a series of books by
Cyril Abraham that go along with the series.
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the
first in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
We have just started the 1975 version of Poldark. What a
contrast to
the 2015 version in cinematic style and acting, and even
casting. Now here is a real study in the difference
between method acting and theatrical acting.
Thanks for the tip, Nyssa.
Howard
Glad to be of service, Howard.

I'll be interested to hear which version of Poldark you
prefer and why.

Since I liked the first one well enough to get the Region 2
DVDs from the UK before they became available here, I never
bothered to try to find the newer version. Also I get so
few TV channels since the digital changeover, I probably
couldn't have received whatever channel carried it anyway.

I'd also like to know if you like "The Onedin Line." I
sent my DVDs to friends I thought would like it and they
turned thumbs down. I think it was because they didn't
care for the historical period dramas more than any failings
of the show itself. There were eight series worth of programs,
so if you get hooked, it will keep you going for awhile.

Nyssa, who is still trying to find a better copy of Series
5 Onedin Line than the screwed up Dutch one she has that is
missing an episode
Howard Duck
2017-06-16 03:48:39 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Post by Howard Duck
Thanks for the tip, Nyssa.
Howard
Glad to be of service, Howard.
I'll be interested to hear which version of Poldark you
prefer and why.
Since I liked the first one well enough to get the Region 2
DVDs from the UK before they became available here, I never
bothered to try to find the newer version. Also I get so
few TV channels since the digital changeover, I probably
couldn't have received whatever channel carried it anyway.
I'd also like to know if you like "The Onedin Line." I
sent my DVDs to friends I thought would like it and they
turned thumbs down. I think it was because they didn't
care for the historical period dramas more than any failings
of the show itself. There were eight series worth of programs,
so if you get hooked, it will keep you going for awhile.
Nyssa, who is still trying to find a better copy of Series
5 Onedin Line than the screwed up Dutch one she has that is
missing an episode
We have just finished the 4th episode of the 1975 version of Poldark.
I will venture to say this about it. It is a bit different that the
2015 version - basically the same story, but with a few small but
significant differences. In the new version, Elizabeth never agrees
to leave Francis for Ross, even after Francis's loose living and
squandering money. Ross doesn't have to be confronted with Demelza's
pregnancy before asking her to marry him. I suspect the original
version is closer to the books than the later version. The original
version is done in a dramatically theatrical manner, with lines
quickly and rather melodramatically delivered as from a stage to a
live audience. They squeeze a lot into the scenes in order to cover
more of the actual story. The later version is more interested in
delivering a smooth storyline with pregnant pauses, etc., rather than
trying to cover all important points in the printed version. The
later version has all the advantages of capturing close-ups with
facial expressions and quietly delivered lines.

But alas, all I have been able to see of the newer version is 2 of the
4 seasons (about half of the total). We'll have to see where the
original version goes after this. Let's see, where we ended with the
newer version was shortly after George Warleggan and Elizabeth were
confronted with a mob enraged by the fencing off of their property
with an armed guard.

Demelza is unforgiving toward Ross throughout the entirety of Season 2
until the very end. Ross doesn't actually strike a wealth of tin or
copper until the last episode.

It may not interest others as it does me, but I have long been
interested in what makes drama more or less realistic and emotionally
gripping. That is where we get into various schools of acting. If
one is merely interested in a storyline without much concern over the
lines and method of delivery, then the latter may not matter much. But
when I watch a Dustin Hoffman or Robert De Niro or Al Pacino or
Anthony Hopkins, I am overwhelmed by the realism they bring to the
screen. The actors in the 1975 version of Poldark are clearly
theatrical actors, not screen actors. Never did Ross or Elizabeth
convince me that they were really in love with each other. Nor did
Demelza really make me think she was in love with Ross. The qualities
of personas and believability of scenes are what make acting and
directing emotionally satisfying to me, whether or not the
personalities are lovable or hateful.

Hope this helps to see my point of view. As to The Onedin Line, I'll
have to check into that later. All IMDb shows for a storyline is one
paragraph:
James Onedin marries Anne Webster in order to get his hands on a ship.
However the marriage turns out to be one of true love. James is
ruthless in his attempt to get a shipping line started in Liverpool of
the 1860s,

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-16 12:46:41 UTC
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On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 09:15:12 -0400, Nyssa
Post by Nyssa
Post by Howard Duck
Thanks for the tip, Nyssa.
Howard
Glad to be of service, Howard.
I'll be interested to hear which version of Poldark you
prefer and why.
Since I liked the first one well enough to get the Region
2 DVDs from the UK before they became available here, I
never bothered to try to find the newer version. Also I
get so few TV channels since the digital changeover, I
probably couldn't have received whatever channel carried
it anyway.
I'd also like to know if you like "The Onedin Line." I
sent my DVDs to friends I thought would like it and they
turned thumbs down. I think it was because they didn't
care for the historical period dramas more than any
failings of the show itself. There were eight series worth
of programs, so if you get hooked, it will keep you going
for awhile.
Nyssa, who is still trying to find a better copy of Series
5 Onedin Line than the screwed up Dutch one she has that
is missing an episode
We have just finished the 4th episode of the 1975 version
of Poldark.
I will venture to say this about it. It is a bit
different that the 2015 version - basically the same
story, but with a few small but
significant differences. In the new version, Elizabeth
never agrees to leave Francis for Ross, even after
Francis's loose living and
squandering money. Ross doesn't have to be confronted
with Demelza's
pregnancy before asking her to marry him. I suspect the
original
version is closer to the books than the later version.
The original version is done in a dramatically theatrical
manner, with lines quickly and rather melodramatically
delivered as from a stage to a
live audience. They squeeze a lot into the scenes in
order to cover
more of the actual story. The later version is more
interested in delivering a smooth storyline with pregnant
pauses, etc., rather than
trying to cover all important points in the printed
version. The later version has all the advantages of
capturing close-ups with facial expressions and quietly
delivered lines.
But alas, all I have been able to see of the newer version
is 2 of the
4 seasons (about half of the total). We'll have to see
where the
original version goes after this. Let's see, where we
ended with the newer version was shortly after George
Warleggan and Elizabeth were confronted with a mob enraged
by the fencing off of their property with an armed guard.
Demelza is unforgiving toward Ross throughout the entirety
of Season 2
until the very end. Ross doesn't actually strike a wealth
of tin or copper until the last episode.
It may not interest others as it does me, but I have long
been interested in what makes drama more or less realistic
and emotionally
gripping. That is where we get into various schools of
acting. If one is merely interested in a storyline
without much concern over the lines and method of
delivery, then the latter may not matter much. But when I
watch a Dustin Hoffman or Robert De Niro or Al Pacino or
Anthony Hopkins, I am overwhelmed by the realism they
bring to the
screen. The actors in the 1975 version of Poldark are
clearly
theatrical actors, not screen actors. Never did Ross or
Elizabeth
convince me that they were really in love with each other.
Nor did
Demelza really make me think she was in love with Ross.
The qualities of personas and believability of scenes are
what make acting and directing emotionally satisfying to
me, whether or not the personalities are lovable or
hateful.
Hope this helps to see my point of view. As to The Onedin
Line, I'll
have to check into that later. All IMDb shows for a
James Onedin marries Anne Webster in order to get his
hands on a ship. However the marriage turns out to be one
of true love. James is ruthless in his attempt to get a
shipping line started in Liverpool of the 1860s,
Howard
From your description, it sounds like the newer version of
Poldark varies greatly from the books. Elizabeth never
leaves Francis in the book. Francis is killed in an accident
as shown in the older version of the series.

I'm not surprised that the original version came across
like stage acting to you since most of the actors had
stage experience rather than films or television at the
time. I'm the type who cares about story, and when it's
an adaptation from book(s), that it's true to the original,
so it sounds as though the newer version would be a miss
for me.

The capsule description of Onedin Line is accurate for
a starter. There's much more involved of course, including
many rivalries, wheeling and dealing, the rest of the
Onedin family, especially the sister (another Elizabeth)
and the shopkeeper brother. Not everyone's cuppa, but I
ended up getting the stack of DVDs for the whole series
from a Dutch source since my PBS stations never showed
more than the first couple of seasons and I wanted MORE.

The BBC started putting out their own, much better DVDs
but seem to have stopped after the first four series,
leaving four unloved. The Dutch ones aren't very good
transfer-wise and for some reason known only to the Dutch,
each season is just one looooong episode instead of
individual ones. Plus there are problems with missing or
damaged sections on at least two of the releases. I live
in hope of the Beeb getting back on the project and
releasing pristine editions of the last four series.

I'm glad you've found something to watch and enjoy.
Perhaps I'll come up with some other ideas for you once
you get through your current list.

Nyssa, who has several things in mind already
Howard Duck
2017-06-16 13:21:09 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
From your description, it sounds like the newer version of
Poldark varies greatly from the books. Elizabeth never
leaves Francis in the book. Francis is killed in an accident
as shown in the older version of the series.
Francis dies in the newer version also, but Ross doesn't hit it rich
until mear the end of season 2.
Post by Nyssa
I'm not surprised that the original version came across
like stage acting to you since most of the actors had
stage experience rather than films or television at the
time. I'm the type who cares about story, and when it's
an adaptation from book(s), that it's true to the original,
so it sounds as though the newer version would be a miss
for me.
The capsule description of Onedin Line is accurate for
a starter. There's much more involved of course, including
many rivalries, wheeling and dealing, the rest of the
Onedin family, especially the sister (another Elizabeth)
and the shopkeeper brother. Not everyone's cuppa, but I
ended up getting the stack of DVDs for the whole series
from a Dutch source since my PBS stations never showed
more than the first couple of seasons and I wanted MORE.
The BBC started putting out their own, much better DVDs
but seem to have stopped after the first four series,
leaving four unloved. The Dutch ones aren't very good
transfer-wise and for some reason known only to the Dutch,
each season is just one looooong episode instead of
individual ones. Plus there are problems with missing or
damaged sections on at least two of the releases. I live
in hope of the Beeb getting back on the project and
releasing pristine editions of the last four series.
I'm glad you've found something to watch and enjoy.
Perhaps I'll come up with some other ideas for you once
you get through your current list.
Nyssa, who has several things in mind already
Thanks Nyssa.

Howard
Howard Duck
2017-06-19 21:42:11 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
From your description, it sounds like the newer version of
Poldark varies greatly from the books. Elizabeth never
leaves Francis in the book. Francis is killed in an accident
as shown in the older version of the series.
I'm not surprised that the original version came across
like stage acting to you since most of the actors had
stage experience rather than films or television at the
time. I'm the type who cares about story, and when it's
an adaptation from book(s), that it's true to the original,
so it sounds as though the newer version would be a miss
for me.
Just finished episode 8 of the first season (half way through). I see
now there are quite a few changes to times and the way things happen
in the two versions. I am sorry I turned you away from the newer
version by my comments on style, etc. The newer version is still well
done and worth watching I think. But I'm glad to be watching the 1975
version as well.

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-14 23:08:59 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the first
in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Don't know about that one. Who is author? I assume since we like
many of the same, I might want to look it up.

Carol
Nyssa
2017-06-15 13:07:01 UTC
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Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the
first in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Don't know about that one. Who is author? I assume since
we like many of the same, I might want to look it up.
Carol
The author is Melanie Jackson who has several cozy mystery
series to her credit.

I finished "Death of a Gossip" yesterday and enjoyed it.
The mystery itself was middle-of-the-road, but I'm hoping
as the characters develop, the mysteries will too.

The main character, Juliet Henry, is a retired ex-NSA
analyst which is certainly out of the ordinary for
cozy protagonists. She is now an artist living in a
small artists' community in the mid-California mountains
along with other various sculptors, writers, artists,
illustrators, and composers.

One of Miss Henry's neighbors is found dead, and since
there was a terrible storm overnight, only someone in
the artists' colony could have been the murderer. Who
dunnit? Luckily Miss Henry is smart and helps with
the analysis of clues.

Another recent finish is "The Other President" by
E.N.J. Carter. Not as polished as the Miss Henry book
with lots of grammatical problems and it's a political
thriller rather than a cozy. It's not heavy on sex,
bad language, and gore though and is the first of a
series. The plot is the president is injured during
a terrorist raid on the White House and not only loses
his memory, he needs reconstructive surgery. Adding
to the mess is that he's carrying the ID of a non-person
as part of a Secret Service plan to protect him in just
such an mess. Evil Speaker of the House becomes prez
and his aide sets the dogs on the real president with
amnesia to off him so his boss can hold on to power.

For Kindle folk, this one is still free as of yesterday.

Currently reading a non-mystery "The Other Side of the
Moon" which is a biography of David Niven. Something
different as a break from all the murders. ;)

Nyssa, who hopes that the storm that came through last
night will move the temperatures back into the bearable
range for awhile
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-16 21:50:44 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Currently reading a non-mystery "The Other Side of the
Moon" which is a biography of David Niven. Something
different as a break from all the murders. ;)
What is the publication date on this one. Decades ago
I read a biography on him and the title seems slightly
familiar.

I read it because one of my Dad's friends from HS served
with Niven in WWII. He was extremely impressed with Niven
and was always talking about him.

The story I remember my Dad shared was that on D Day
he said to his men something like "C'mon men. You only have
to do this once but I'll have to do it again for the movies."

I don't remember when reading the bio if he actually did
participate in D Day. As I remember, there was quite a
bit of sad events in his life before the '60s.

Carol
Nyssa
2017-06-17 01:00:25 UTC
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Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Currently reading a non-mystery "The Other Side of the
Moon" which is a biography of David Niven. Something
different as a break from all the murders. ;)
What is the publication date on this one. Decades ago
I read a biography on him and the title seems slightly
familiar.
I read it because one of my Dad's friends from HS served
with Niven in WWII. He was extremely impressed with Niven
and was always talking about him.
The story I remember my Dad shared was that on D Day
he said to his men something like "C'mon men. You only
have to do this once but I'll have to do it again for the
movies."
I don't remember when reading the bio if he actually did
participate in D Day. As I remember, there was quite a
bit of sad events in his life before the '60s.
Carol
Publication date was circa 1986, The title is supposed to
be a throwback to Niven's first book of memoirs "The Moon's
a Balloon."

Yes, that quote about "doing it again for the movies" is
mentioned in the book.

He ended up a Lt. Colonel with a commando outfit called the
Phantoms. As part of that, he was a liason officer between
the UK and US forces in France after D-Day, but wasn't
part of the landing forces.

I'm only up to 1946 which is barely halfway through the
book, so I've got a loooong ways to go. His first wife
died only seven weeks after joining him in the US after
the war in a very odd accident while at a party with other
Hollywood notables.

The book was a Kindle freebie from just two weeks ago.
The price was right, and I was in need of something more
substantial than another cozy mystery or political
thriller.

Nyssa, who has a HUGE digital book library thanks to all
the new Kindle freebies that turn up every week
Mike Burke
2017-06-17 12:13:04 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Currently reading a non-mystery "The Other Side of the
Moon" which is a biography of David Niven. Something
different as a break from all the murders. ;)
What is the publication date on this one. Decades ago
I read a biography on him and the title seems slightly
familiar.
I read it because one of my Dad's friends from HS served
with Niven in WWII. He was extremely impressed with Niven
and was always talking about him.
The story I remember my Dad shared was that on D Day
he said to his men something like "C'mon men. You only
have to do this once but I'll have to do it again for the
movies."
I don't remember when reading the bio if he actually did
participate in D Day. As I remember, there was quite a
bit of sad events in his life before the '60s.
Carol
Publication date was circa 1986, The title is supposed to
be a throwback to Niven's first book of memoirs "The Moon's
a Balloon."
Yes, that quote about "doing it again for the movies" is
mentioned in the book.
He ended up a Lt. Colonel with a commando outfit called the
Phantoms. As part of that, he was a liason officer between
the UK and US forces in France after D-Day, but wasn't
part of the landing forces.
I'm only up to 1946 which is barely halfway through the
book, so I've got a loooong ways to go. His first wife
died only seven weeks after joining him in the US after
the war in a very odd accident while at a party with other
Hollywood notables.
The book was a Kindle freebie from just two weeks ago.
The price was right, and I was in need of something more
substantial than another cozy mystery or political
thriller.
Nyssa, who has a HUGE digital book library thanks to all
the new Kindle freebies that turn up every week
The second volume of his autobiography, "Bring On the Empty Horses" was one
of the funniest books I've ever read in my life. He was the genuine
article was Niven, along with the other Hollywood stars who actually fought
in WWII.
--
Mique
Nyssa
2017-06-17 12:50:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Burke
Post by Nyssa
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Currently reading a non-mystery "The Other Side of the
Moon" which is a biography of David Niven. Something
different as a break from all the murders. ;)
What is the publication date on this one. Decades ago
I read a biography on him and the title seems slightly
familiar.
I read it because one of my Dad's friends from HS served
with Niven in WWII. He was extremely impressed with
Niven and was always talking about him.
The story I remember my Dad shared was that on D Day
he said to his men something like "C'mon men. You only
have to do this once but I'll have to do it again for
the movies."
I don't remember when reading the bio if he actually did
participate in D Day. As I remember, there was quite a
bit of sad events in his life before the '60s.
Carol
Publication date was circa 1986, The title is supposed to
be a throwback to Niven's first book of memoirs "The
Moon's a Balloon."
Yes, that quote about "doing it again for the movies" is
mentioned in the book.
He ended up a Lt. Colonel with a commando outfit called
the Phantoms. As part of that, he was a liason officer
between the UK and US forces in France after D-Day, but
wasn't part of the landing forces.
I'm only up to 1946 which is barely halfway through the
book, so I've got a loooong ways to go. His first wife
died only seven weeks after joining him in the US after
the war in a very odd accident while at a party with
other Hollywood notables.
The book was a Kindle freebie from just two weeks ago.
The price was right, and I was in need of something more
substantial than another cozy mystery or political
thriller.
Nyssa, who has a HUGE digital book library thanks to all
the new Kindle freebies that turn up every week
The second volume of his autobiography, "Bring On the
Empty Horses" was one
of the funniest books I've ever read in my life. He was
the genuine article was Niven, along with the other
Hollywood stars who actually fought in WWII.
That book is mentioned in this biography and it tells
where that title comes from. A big-name Hollywood director
from Europe had questionable skills in English, so when
he wanted riderless horses on the set he asked for empty
ones instead.

Most of the other British actors that were in Hollywood
are mentioned and why some did or did not go home to fight
during WWII.

It's taking me longer to get through this one, but it's
interesting enough to keep me involved.

Nyssa, who is learning a bit about other actors of the time
as well as the hated studio contract system
Mike Burke
2017-06-18 02:01:24 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Post by Mike Burke
The second volume of his autobiography, "Bring On the
Empty Horses" was one
of the funniest books I've ever read in my life. He was
the genuine article was Niven, along with the other
Hollywood stars who actually fought in WWII.
That book is mentioned in this biography and it tells
where that title comes from. A big-name Hollywood director
from Europe had questionable skills in English, so when
he wanted riderless horses on the set he asked for empty
ones instead.
Most of the other British actors that were in Hollywood
are mentioned and why some did or did not go home to fight
during WWII.
It's taking me longer to get through this one, but it's
interesting enough to keep me involved.
Nyssa, who is learning a bit about other actors of the time
as well as the hated studio contract system
<Snipt>
Another gem in that book about the same Hollywood director had him quoted
as saying (words to the effect) "You say I know f*** nothing, but I tell
you I know f*** all!"
--
Mique
Nyssa
2017-06-18 13:43:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike Burke
Post by Nyssa
Post by Mike Burke
The second volume of his autobiography, "Bring On the
Empty Horses" was one
of the funniest books I've ever read in my life. He was
the genuine article was Niven, along with the other
Hollywood stars who actually fought in WWII.
That book is mentioned in this biography and it tells
where that title comes from. A big-name Hollywood
director from Europe had questionable skills in English,
so when he wanted riderless horses on the set he asked
for empty ones instead.
Most of the other British actors that were in Hollywood
are mentioned and why some did or did not go home to
fight during WWII.
It's taking me longer to get through this one, but it's
interesting enough to keep me involved.
Nyssa, who is learning a bit about other actors of the
time as well as the hated studio contract system
<Snipt>
Another gem in that book about the same Hollywood director
had him quoted as saying (words to the effect) "You say I
know f*** nothing, but I tell you I know f*** all!"
Yes, that one is mentioned in this biography too.

There's another celebrity autobiography you might enjoy,
"Blind in One Ear" by Patrick MacNee.

Lots of funny anecdotes and a description of his dysfunctional
family and childhood that will make you wonder how he ever
came out of it without a lot of mental health problems.

I'm still slogging through the Niven biography. He's now
hit 50 and is living in Europe. I'd forgotten (or was
never aware) that he had won an Oscar. The only movies
I remember seeing him in were "The Pink Panther" and
"55 Days at Peking" so it's not much of a surprise that
I missed his winning role.

Two days of thunderboomers and at least another one due
today, so I'll be reading instead of gardening...again.

Nyssa, who is SO glad she got the lawn mowed in the nick
of time before the storms started, but may be needing an
ark if this stuff keeps coming
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-20 09:06:05 UTC
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Raw Message
The only movies
Post by Nyssa
I remember seeing him in were "The Pink Panther" and
"55 Days at Peking" so it's not much of a surprise that
I missed his winning role.
Oh sweetie have you missed a LOT of great movies.

Murder by Death - A Neil Simon spoof pitting easily identifiable detectives resembling famous literary detectives like Miss Marple, Nick and Nora Charles and Miss Marple, against a murderer - with Maggie Smith, Truman Capote, Peter Falk, Eileen Brennan, James Coco, Nancy Walker, Alec Guiness, Elsa Lanchester, Estelle Winwood, Peter Sellers, and a couple I've probably forgot.

Death on the Nile - an Agatha Christie on film

The Bishops Wife - a really lovely Christmas story with Cary Grant, Loretta Young,Elsa Lanchester This is a must see on my Christmas movie list every year.

Bachelor Mother - with Ginger Rogers I think. Also set in the Christmas season, comedy/romance. Remade later by Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher as Bundle of Joy. TCM ran them back to back last year or the year before.

Don't Eat the Daisy's - Based on the book of the same name by Jean Kerr. comedy with Doris Day, better than average for hers. He's at his best. Also Janis Paige, Jack Weston in an early role, and one of my favorite actresses, Spring Byington.

The Impossible Years - comedy, professor struggles with raising a teenage daughter during the 60's, with Lola Albright, Christian Ferrare, Chad Everett, a young Darlene Carr, and even Ozzie Nelson

Prudence & the Pill - a rather obscure comedy from the early 70's involves the recently invented birth control pill

Around the World in 80 Days - with Shirley MacClaine, star studded with major stars in bit parts (Marlene Detrich, Charles Boyer, Frank Sinatra, John Mills etc.) heavily populated by wonderful character actors from the 1950's too

The Guns of Navarone - WWII war movie with Gregory Peck, Anthony Quinn, Anthony Quayle, Irene Papas, Gia Scala, James Darren and in a very early scene a young Richard Harris - nail biter, lots of action

The Best of Enemies - another WWII movie, obscure but shows up from time to time on Turner Classic Movies. The relationship between a British POW and an Italian officer in custody of him in Africa just as the Italians surrender. As the film goes on, they exchange rolls more than once, some comic moments but mostly struggle for survival for their men as the war situation changes drastically. No battles, but a couple minor skirmishes

You should try to find a couple of these.

Carol
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-20 09:07:54 UTC
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Post by Carol Dickinson
Murder by Death - A Neil Simon spoof pitting easily identifiable detectives resembling famous literary detectives like Miss Marple, Nick and Nora Charles and Miss Marple, against a murderer - with Maggie Smith, Truman Capote, Peter Falk, Eileen Brennan, James Coco, Nancy Walker, Alec Guiness, Elsa Lanchester, Estelle Winwood, Peter Sellers, and a couple I've probably forgot.
Oops I see I said Miss Maple Twice but I was thinking Charlie Chan
Nyssa
2017-06-20 12:43:52 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
The only movies
Post by Nyssa
I remember seeing him in were "The Pink Panther" and
"55 Days at Peking" so it's not much of a surprise that
I missed his winning role.
Oh sweetie have you missed a LOT of great movies.
Murder by Death - A Neil Simon spoof pitting easily
identifiable detectives resembling famous literary
detectives like Miss Marple, Nick and Nora Charles and
Miss Marple, against a murderer - with Maggie Smith,
Truman Capote, Peter Falk, Eileen Brennan, James Coco,
Nancy Walker, Alec Guiness, Elsa Lanchester, Estelle
Winwood, Peter Sellers, and a couple I've probably forgot.
Death on the Nile - an Agatha Christie on film
The Bishops Wife - a really lovely Christmas story with
Cary Grant, Loretta Young,Elsa Lanchester This is a must
see on my Christmas movie list every year.
Bachelor Mother - with Ginger Rogers I think. Also set in
the Christmas season, comedy/romance. Remade later by
Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher as Bundle of Joy. TCM
ran them back to back last year or the year before.
Don't Eat the Daisy's - Based on the book of the same name
by Jean Kerr. comedy with Doris Day, better than average
for hers. He's at his best. Also Janis Paige, Jack Weston
in an early role, and one of my favorite actresses,
Spring Byington.
The Impossible Years - comedy, professor struggles with
raising a teenage daughter during the 60's, with Lola
Albright, Christian Ferrare, Chad Everett, a young Darlene
Carr, and even Ozzie Nelson
Prudence & the Pill - a rather obscure comedy from the
early 70's involves the recently invented birth control
pill
Around the World in 80 Days - with Shirley MacClaine, star
studded with major stars in bit parts (Marlene Detrich,
Charles Boyer, Frank Sinatra, John Mills etc.) heavily
populated by wonderful character actors from the 1950's
too
The Guns of Navarone - WWII war movie with Gregory Peck,
Anthony Quinn, Anthony Quayle, Irene Papas, Gia Scala,
James Darren and in a very early scene a young Richard
Harris - nail biter, lots of action
The Best of Enemies - another WWII movie, obscure but
shows up from time to time on Turner Classic Movies. The
relationship between a British POW and an Italian officer
in custody of him in Africa just as the Italians
surrender. As the film goes on, they exchange rolls more
than once, some comic moments but mostly struggle for
survival for their men as the war situation changes
drastically. No battles, but a couple minor skirmishes
You should try to find a couple of these.
Carol
All of these movies were mentioned in the biography. I do
remember seeing a few episodes of his TV series, The Rogues,
but only vaguely.

I'm really more of a reader than a watcher. I've got about
a hundred DVDs that I haven't even opened yet much less
taken the time to watch. I thought about watching one over
the rainy weekend, but couldn't decide which one would
hold my attention for a couple of hours more than a book
would, so I read books.

I still haven't finished watching Breaking Bad because I
can't motivate myself to commit the time to just sitting
and vegetating for that long. That's why I like radio;
I can listen and do something else at the same time, like
bake, knit, or putter and not miss anything. (I enjoyed
an episode of Fibber Magee and Molly from 1945 on the
sat radio last night, for example.)

No doubt when the weather turns into triple-digit hot
and humid, I'll end up watching a DVD simply because it's
too hot to hold a book or Kindle. Meanwhile, I've got
more reading to do.

Nyssa, who always thinks of TV or movie watching as a
passive activity and reading being an active one
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-20 17:20:11 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
I still haven't finished watching Breaking Bad because I
can't motivate myself to commit the time to just sitting
and vegetating for that long. That's why I like radio;
I can listen and do something else at the same time, like
bake, knit, or putter and not miss anything.
Well I'm stuck sitting more often than I'd like because of
my arthritis, and my kidney function sometimes makes my legs
swell so I have to put them up. But I have a very hard time
just sitting and watching TV. I have a small one in my sewing
room where my recliner resides also. I do a lot of crocheting
there while watching/listening to movies. And I do the mending.
I manicure my fingernails. I sort things I've collected in
junk boxes, look through the vast quantity of catalogs I
receive in the mail for fun before throwing them out.


When my arm was in a cast after elbow surgery 5 summers ago I
thought I was going to lose my mind because I only had my left
hand. And I had ice water pumping around my elbow, which means
I was attached to a machine that plugged into the wall. My
spouse would hook me up and go off to work and there I was until
he came home. He did come home at lunch to detach me so I could
visit the bathroom. I could not put any DVDs in the machine
because I couldn't reach it. And there was NOTHING interesting
on the cable that summer. Stinky movies even on Turner Classic
movies. I ended up watching the entire Ann of Green Gables series
3 times because it was much better than anything else and yet
its not really something I would have watched multiple times.

But assuming your computer and the TV are close together you
can "listen" to your movies and do other things. Or you can
do crosswords, write letters, etc all with the movies too.

Of course there are a lot of movies that I could listen to
and enjoy even if I were blind because I've seen them so often.

But if I had to give up either books or movies for the rest of
my life, I'd give up movies. I couldn't live without books.

Carol
Nyssa
2017-06-20 19:05:18 UTC
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Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
I still haven't finished watching Breaking Bad because I
can't motivate myself to commit the time to just sitting
and vegetating for that long. That's why I like radio;
I can listen and do something else at the same time, like
bake, knit, or putter and not miss anything.
Well I'm stuck sitting more often than I'd like because of
my arthritis, and my kidney function sometimes makes my
legs swell so I have to put them up. But I have a very
hard time just sitting and watching TV. I have a small one
in my sewing room where my recliner resides also. I do a
lot of crocheting there while watching/listening to
movies. And I do the mending. I manicure my fingernails. I
sort things I've collected in junk boxes, look through the
vast quantity of catalogs I receive in the mail for fun
before throwing them out.
When my arm was in a cast after elbow surgery 5 summers
ago I thought I was going to lose my mind because I only
had my left hand. And I had ice water pumping around my
elbow, which means I was attached to a machine that
plugged into the wall. My spouse would hook me up and go
off to work and there I was until he came home. He did
come home at lunch to detach me so I could visit the
bathroom. I could not put any DVDs in the machine because
I couldn't reach it. And there was NOTHING interesting on
the cable that summer. Stinky movies even on Turner
Classic movies. I ended up watching the entire Ann of
Green Gables series 3 times because it was much better
than anything else and yet its not really something I
would have watched multiple times.
But assuming your computer and the TV are close together
you can "listen" to your movies and do other things. Or
you can do crosswords, write letters, etc all with the
movies too.
Of course there are a lot of movies that I could listen to
and enjoy even if I were blind because I've seen them so
often.
But if I had to give up either books or movies for the
rest of my life, I'd give up movies. I couldn't live
without books.
Carol
I agree about giving up movies before I'd give up books.
No contest!

No, my computer isn't near either of my seldom-used TVs.
If the movie isn't that engaging, yes, I might do something
like knitting or making up a grocery list, but if it's
that boring, why watch it?

My sat radio isn't near my computer either, so I usually
just crank up the volume to listen while I compute, but
now that the hot weather is here, I need to run a fan on
the modem and computer to keep it cooler, so the fan
noise pretty much covers up the radio. The computer
room is on the wrong side to get a good connection to
the satellite signal, so I can't move the radio to
listen. So I just work faster on the computer.

That water pump gizmo you had would have made me want
to go to the bathroom every five minutes. I don't know
how you held out until lunchtime.

Nyssa, who has a similar problem with washing dishes
so goes before she starts the water running
Howard Duck
2017-06-21 04:06:49 UTC
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Nyssa
I love old time radio shows like Fibber McGee & Molly. I have a bunch
on CDs but find myself with other things to do. Fond memories from
childhood.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-21 13:13:47 UTC
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On Tue, 20 Jun 2017 15:05:18 -0400, Nyssa
Nyssa
I love old time radio shows like Fibber McGee & Molly. I
have a bunch
on CDs but find myself with other things to do. Fond
memories from childhood.
Howard
I've got stacks of CDs with old radio shows too, purchased
from otrcat.com at reasonable prices. So far I don't have
Fibber Magee and Molly, but it's on my wishlist.

I'm a happy customer of otrcat.com and recommend the
company highly. They offer free downloads of an episode
of most shows plus special free downloads on holidays
or other special events of related shows and episodes.
Another extra is the sampler CDs they offer free with
orders that packed with lots of shows. I've found some
real gems on a few of those freebies.

I've got a couple of Sansa Clip MP3 players, both were
fairly inexpensive. The newer one has the microSD slot
for more capacity, so I purchased a couple of 16GB cards
and loaded them up with the contents of my radio show CDs.

Now I can listen to any of those shows via the matchbook-
sized MP3 player while I'm weeding the garden or doing
housework. Unfortunately the mower is too loud to use the
player while I mow, but at least I have other activities
where I can listen and work.

Meanwhile, I checked paperbackswap.com and found a few
Miss Henry mysteries in DTB format. I ordered #5 using
my credits, but am still missing #4 and #7 which unfortunately
weren't listed. The books are all so short, yet the book and
Kindle to-buy prices are sort of high when you consider
page count. My frugal gene urges me to wait until I find
free or cheaper options.

I did manage to find a used copy of Blanco County #8
listed as very good condition at Amazon, so that one is ordered
and on the way too.

Nyssa, who isn't going to run out of reading (or listening)
material any time soon
Howard Duck
2017-06-21 22:04:17 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
On Tue, 20 Jun 2017 15:05:18 -0400, Nyssa
Nyssa
I love old time radio shows like Fibber McGee & Molly. I
have a bunch
on CDs but find myself with other things to do. Fond
memories from childhood.
Howard
I've got stacks of CDs with old radio shows too, purchased
from otrcat.com at reasonable prices. So far I don't have
Fibber Magee and Molly, but it's on my wishlist.
I'm a happy customer of otrcat.com and recommend the
company highly. They offer free downloads of an episode
of most shows plus special free downloads on holidays
or other special events of related shows and episodes.
Another extra is the sampler CDs they offer free with
orders that packed with lots of shows. I've found some
real gems on a few of those freebies.
I've got a couple of Sansa Clip MP3 players, both were
fairly inexpensive. The newer one has the microSD slot
for more capacity, so I purchased a couple of 16GB cards
and loaded them up with the contents of my radio show CDs.
Now I can listen to any of those shows via the matchbook-
sized MP3 player while I'm weeding the garden or doing
housework. Unfortunately the mower is too loud to use the
player while I mow, but at least I have other activities
where I can listen and work.
Meanwhile, I checked paperbackswap.com and found a few
Miss Henry mysteries in DTB format. I ordered #5 using
my credits, but am still missing #4 and #7 which unfortunately
weren't listed. The books are all so short, yet the book and
Kindle to-buy prices are sort of high when you consider
page count. My frugal gene urges me to wait until I find
free or cheaper options.
I did manage to find a used copy of Blanco County #8
listed as very good condition at Amazon, so that one is ordered
and on the way too.
Nyssa, who isn't going to run out of reading (or listening)
material any time soon
Fred Allen had a radio program I remember. Allen's Alley had a number
of comic characters. When TV came on the scene someone asked Allen if
he would move from radio to television. He said he didn't think so.
"With radio," he said, " they can't see what you look like. On
television they can see you and someone might follow you home and beat
your brains out."

Judy Canova was another good one with several guest comics. Then
there was, "It Pays to Be Ignorant." And Charlie McCarthy and Edgar
Bergen - you'd never suspect a ventriloquist could go over on radio,
but this one did. The dialog was funny and great. I may get back
into these one day soon.

My wife and I are just starting Miss Henry's book #1, Portrait of a
Gossip. Looks good so far. I joined Amazon's free Kindle books
program so I could get these free. But it costs to join - about $9
per month. I may not find it worth continuing. A glance at the
Blanco County books makes me think they might not be the thing for us.
Thanks again for the Miss Henry suggestion. Any other good cozies
will be welcome suggestions. The Three Pines mysteries are turning
out to be fun, but they are not included with the free Kindle program.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-22 14:57:49 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
My wife and I are just starting Miss Henry's book #1,
Portrait of a
Gossip. Looks good so far. I joined Amazon's free Kindle
books
program so I could get these free. But it costs to join -
about $9
per month. I may not find it worth continuing. A glance
at the Blanco County books makes me think they might not
be the thing for us.
Thanks again for the Miss Henry suggestion. Any other
good cozies
will be welcome suggestions. The Three Pines mysteries
are turning out to be fun, but they are not included with
the free Kindle program.
Howard
Sometime during your hiatus from ram I posted a couple of
long posts covering some mystery series I had read/was reading
including several cozies.

Two of them I mentioned then might be worth looking up for
you and the missus.

There is a five book series by Shannon Hill, Sheriff Lil
and Boris, that starts with "Crazy, VA." It's a humorous
one set in a small town in the Virgina mountains that has
a female sheriff. Good characters, decent mysteries.
They are available for Kindle and in paperback. I enjoyed
the first couple of them that I got for free on the Kindle
and ended up buying the whole set in paperback.

The other series was the Hollywood Mysteries set in post-
WWII Hollywood. The main character is a PR guy for one
of the studios and there are a lot of references to "current"
stars and movies mixed into the mystery. The author is
Peter Fischer who was a TV writer for several series including
Murder She Wrote. The problem with these is that the Kindle
versions are no longer available. There are paperbacks out,
but the last one is OOP (the one I don't have :P). You may
be able to find used copies or new ones through Amazon
marketplace.

One possibility for the Kindle versions of the books is
a loan done from me to you going through Amazon *if* the
books are lend-able. (Another reason to prefer DTBs over
digital.) Let me know if you'd like to try this possibility,
keeping in mind that it would only be for 14 days and then
I could never, ever lend that book to anyone ever again
(oh, how I dislike that gotcha, especially for books that
are no longer available for sale!).

I'll rummage through my memory banks to see if any of the
other series I mentioned back in those old posts might come
to mind.

Nyssa, who could always rummage through the stacks of books
scattered all over the house as well
Howard Duck
2017-06-23 05:05:58 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who could always rummage through the stacks of books
scattered all over the house as well
I'll check into the Shannon Hill and Hollywood Mysteries. Thanks for
the suggestions.
Post by Nyssa
One possibility for the Kindle versions of the books is a loan done from me to you…
Think we'll pass on this one though. Thanks for the offer just the
same, Nyssa. We've got enough going to hold us for the time being.

Howard
Howard Duck
2017-06-23 11:29:34 UTC
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I had to reorder these Shannon Hill and Miss Henry Kindle books to
purchase. I didn't understand that the Kindle free program is only a
lending library. You are only allowed 10 books out at a time and must
eventually return them. Not worth the $10 monthly for us.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-23 14:40:59 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Howard Duck
I had to reorder these Shannon Hill and Miss Henry Kindle
books to
purchase. I didn't understand that the Kindle free
program is only a
lending library. You are only allowed 10 books out at a
time and must
eventually return them. Not worth the $10 monthly for us.
Howard
Yes, it's Kindle LIMITED, not Unlimited.

Another gotcha are for people who read Kindle books through
the Kindle Unlimited subscription program and then review them
on Amazon. They don't get the "Amazon Verified Purchased" tag
even though they paid a fee to read the book. With the new
review sorting algorithm, their review will then get placed below
all the "verified" ones regardless of how helpful and detailed
it might be. Verified Purchase tagged "Great read" trumps
the longer, more insightful reviews without the tag.

I noticed the Shannon Hill books were Kindle Unlimited
accessible, but since you're dropping the "service" it
won't matter anymore.

Nyssa, who just started reading Miss Henry #3 this morning

Carol Dickinson
2017-06-21 22:04:43 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
No, my computer isn't near either of my seldom-used TVs.
If the movie isn't that engaging, yes, I might do something
like knitting or making up a grocery list, but if it's
that boring, why watch it?
It is not that the movie would be boring. I don't watch movies
that bore me. But I can't "just sit."
Post by Nyssa
That water pump gizmo you had would have made me want
to go to the bathroom every five minutes. I don't know
how you held out until lunchtime.
Well I managed because I had no choice so
1. despite my kidney issue I did not drink as
much fluid as I should have and

2. they do make adult diapers. TMI?
I protected my upholstery with a plastic cover and
a washable blanket

Carol
Chris F.A. Johnson
2017-06-22 04:12:44 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Nyssa
The only movies
Post by Nyssa
I remember seeing him in were "The Pink Panther" and
"55 Days at Peking" so it's not much of a surprise that
I missed his winning role.
Oh sweetie have you missed a LOT of great movies.
Murder by Death - A Neil Simon spoof pitting easily identifiable
detectives resembling famous literary detectives like Miss Marple,
Nick and Nora Charles and Miss Marple, against a murderer - with
Maggie Smith, Truman Capote, Peter Falk, Eileen Brennan, James Coco,
Nancy Walker, Alec Guiness, Elsa Lanchester, Estelle Winwood, Peter
Sellers, and a couple I've probably forgot.
That was a lot of fun. A little (a lot?) silly at times, though.
Post by Nyssa
Death on the Nile - an Agatha Christie on film
Good but not great.
Post by Nyssa
The Bishops Wife - a really lovely Christmas story with Cary Grant,
Loretta Young,Elsa Lanchester This is a must see on my Christmas
movie list every year.
I thinks I saw this a few years ago, but I don't remember much about it.
Post by Nyssa
Bachelor Mother - with Ginger Rogers I think. Also set in the Christmas season, comedy/romance. Remade later by Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher as Bundle of Joy. TCM ran them back to back last year or the year before.
I haven't seen this... yes, it is Ginger Rogers
Post by Nyssa
Don't Eat the Daisy's - Based on the book of the same name by Jean Kerr. comedy with Doris Day, better than average for hers. He's at his best. Also Janis Paige, Jack Weston in an early role, and one of my favorite actresses, Spring Byington.
"Please Don't Eat the Daisies" (1960) I haven't seen this. I'll look
for it.
Post by Nyssa
The Impossible Years - comedy, professor struggles with raising a teenage daughter during the 60's, with Lola Albright, Christian Ferrare, Chad Everett, a young Darlene Carr, and even Ozzie Nelson
Another one I haven't seen.
Post by Nyssa
Prudence & the Pill - a rather obscure comedy from the early 70's involves the recently invented birth control pill
And another (from 1968).
Post by Nyssa
Around the World in 80 Days - with Shirley MacClaine, star studded
with major stars in bit parts (Marlene Detrich, Charles Boyer, Frank
Sinatra, John Mills etc.) heavily populated by wonderful character
actors from the 1950's too
Very long, but worth the time spent.
Post by Nyssa
The Guns of Navarone - WWII war movie with Gregory Peck, Anthony
Quinn, Anthony Quayle, Irene Papas, Gia Scala, James Darren and in a
very early scene a young Richard Harris - nail biter, lots of action
I'm not a fan or war movies, but I've watched this several times and
will no doubt do so again.
Post by Nyssa
The Best of Enemies - another WWII movie, obscure but shows up from
time to time on Turner Classic Movies. The relationship between a
British POW and an Italian officer in custody of him in Africa just
as the Italians surrender. As the film goes on, they exchange rolls
more than once, some comic moments but mostly struggle for survival
for their men as the war situation changes drastically. No battles,
but a couple minor skirmishes
I don't know this one. I'll see if I can fnd it.

And don't forget "Wuthering Heights" and "Raffles", both from 1939.
--
Chris F.A. Johnson
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-22 19:31:00 UTC
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Post by Chris F.A. Johnson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Murder by Death - A Neil Simon spoof pitting easily identifiable
detectives resembling famous literary detectives like Miss Marple,
Nick and Nora Charles and Miss Marple, against a murderer - with
Maggie Smith, Truman Capote, Peter Falk, Eileen Brennan, James Coco,
Nancy Walker, Alec Guiness, Elsa Lanchester, Estelle Winwood, Peter
Sellers, and a couple I've probably forgot.
That was a lot of fun. A little (a lot?) silly at times, though.
That was the point. That is the definition of spoof.

Carol
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-18 07:46:00 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Post by Carol Dickinson
What is the publication date on this one. Decades ago
I read a biography on him and the title seems slightly
familiar.
Carol
Publication date was circa 1986, The title is supposed to
be a throwback to Niven's first book of memoirs "The Moon's
a Balloon."
The Moon's a Balloon is the one I must have read, because I read
it before 1986. The title sounds more familiar too. Interesting
the story my Dad's friend told is actually in the second book.
Must have made an impression on lots of the men he was with.

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-06-16 03:00:12 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:08:59 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the first
in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Don't know about that one. Who is author? I assume since we like
many of the same, I might want to look it up.
Carol
My wife and I are going to try these also. I've order eleven of these
for Kindle.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-16 12:50:27 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:08:59 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the
first in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Don't know about that one. Who is author? I assume since
we like many of the same, I might want to look it up.
Carol
My wife and I are going to try these also. I've order
eleven of these for Kindle.
Howard
Just a heads-up. There are actually 12 books in the Miss
Henry series, although Amazon's sorting shows only 11 on
some pages and 12 on others depending on how you hold your
mouth, I think.

Amazon for all its size and resources has some of the poorest
designed and written software on the Internet, including and
especially their wonky product searches,

I'm still wading through the David Niven biography at the
moment, and will probably jump into Miss Henry #2 once that's
done.

Nyssa, who has towers of both real and virtual TBR piles
Howard Duck
2017-06-16 13:52:25 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Post by Howard Duck
On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:08:59 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the
first in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Don't know about that one. Who is author? I assume since
we like many of the same, I might want to look it up.
Carol
My wife and I are going to try these also. I've order
eleven of these for Kindle.
Howard
Just a heads-up. There are actually 12 books in the Miss
Henry series, although Amazon's sorting shows only 11 on
some pages and 12 on others depending on how you hold your
mouth, I think.
Amazon for all its size and resources has some of the poorest
designed and written software on the Internet, including and
especially their wonky product searches,
I'm still wading through the David Niven biography at the
moment, and will probably jump into Miss Henry #2 once that's
done.
Nyssa, who has towers of both real and virtual TBR piles
I did find book 13, and a reference to Midsummer Murder, so I got it
too. Thaks for the heads up.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-06-16 14:40:23 UTC
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On Fri, 16 Jun 2017 08:50:27 -0400, Nyssa
Post by Nyssa
Post by Howard Duck
On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:08:59 -0700 (PDT), Carol
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
Nyssa, who is currently giving "Death of a Gossip" the
first in the Miss Henry Mystery series a try
Don't know about that one. Who is author? I assume since
we like many of the same, I might want to look it up.
Carol
My wife and I are going to try these also. I've order
eleven of these for Kindle.
Howard
Just a heads-up. There are actually 12 books in the Miss
Henry series, although Amazon's sorting shows only 11 on
some pages and 12 on others depending on how you hold your
mouth, I think.
Amazon for all its size and resources has some of the
poorest designed and written software on the Internet,
including and especially their wonky product searches,
I'm still wading through the David Niven biography at the
moment, and will probably jump into Miss Henry #2 once
that's done.
Nyssa, who has towers of both real and virtual TBR piles
I did find book 13, and a reference to Midsummer Murder,
so I got it
too. Thaks for the heads up.
Howard
Yes, the Midsummer Murders is a bundle of stories featuring
three of the author's series, but includes #11 from Miss
Henry. Confusing! Luckily I had it already, I just needed
to send it to my Kindles.

It turns out I'm missing three of the Miss Henry series,
plus this #13 I hadn't heard of previously.

It seems I'm always trying to do the literary equivalent of
filling an inside straight. Missing books in series are
very disturbing and upset my sense of order. ;)

Nyssa, who will have to keep an eye on those missing titles
until the Kindle Book Gods make them come up free again
Howard Duck
2017-06-16 21:36:09 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Yes, the Midsummer Murders is a bundle of stories featuring
three of the author's series, but includes #11 from Miss
Henry. Confusing! Luckily I had it already, I just needed
to send it to my Kindles.
It turns out I'm missing three of the Miss Henry series,
plus this #13 I hadn't heard of previously.
It seems I'm always trying to do the literary equivalent of
filling an inside straight. Missing books in series are
very disturbing and upset my sense of order. ;)
Nyssa, who will have to keep an eye on those missing titles
until the Kindle Book Gods make them come up free again
I got numbers 2 through 4 and 5 through 8 as bundles. Hope it
includes everything. She's a prolific writer. I also hope the Miss
Henry stories are similar to the Miss Marple series.

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-06-14 23:07:50 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Here is another 18th century drama (thinking of Outlander series).
Amazon Prime has 2 of the 4 seasons of the 2015+ version indicated by
IMDb. It seems to be based on a novel by Winston Graham. We have
watched the 18 episodes available. Quite interesting. This is
Masterpiece Theater aired on PBS originally. There is a 1975 version
available on Acorn TV. I guess we'll watch it also.
Howard Duck
I did watch the earlier version, sort of, because I was living with my parents and my mother had it on. I tried to read the books, but just couldn't get into them. The new series I have not watched. Doesn't seem to be on a channel I have access to. But the actor who plays Poldark is another one of those that the Outlander fans find dreamy. His mug shows up in a lot of the fan pages.

I have pretty much stopped reading most of the Outlander fan pages and just rely on Diana Gabaldon's posts to keep up with the schedule and filming news.

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-06-15 02:53:18 UTC
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On Wed, 14 Jun 2017 16:07:50 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Howard Duck
Here is another 18th century drama (thinking of Outlander series).
Amazon Prime has 2 of the 4 seasons of the 2015+ version indicated by
IMDb. It seems to be based on a novel by Winston Graham. We have
watched the 18 episodes available. Quite interesting. This is
Masterpiece Theater aired on PBS originally. There is a 1975 version
available on Acorn TV. I guess we'll watch it also.
Howard Duck
I did watch the earlier version, sort of, because I was living with my parents and my mother had it on. I tried to read the books, but just couldn't get into them. The new series I have not watched. Doesn't seem to be on a channel I have access to. But the actor who plays Poldark is another one of those that the Outlander fans find dreamy. His mug shows up in a lot of the fan pages.
I have pretty much stopped reading most of the Outlander fan pages and just rely on Diana Gabaldon's posts to keep up with the schedule and filming news.
Carol
I get pretty upset with Ross Poldark. His hanging on to Elizabeth
almost cost him everything imortant. Both Ross and Elizabeth are
really good at making wrong decisions.

Howard
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