Discussion:
Happy 80th, Joan Rawlins Biggar! ("Megan Parnell" juvenile series, 1990s)
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2016-10-19 01:01:06 UTC
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She lives in Stanwood, Washington.

Aka Joan Rawlins Biggar Husby, and Joan Rawlins-Husby, her name is pronounced "Joanne."

In an interview, she said:

"...In each of my eight books Concordia has published, the story starts with an interesting setting somewhere in the Pacific Northwest (except for Trapped in Haunted Canyon, which is set in Arizona). Mostly these are areas where my husband's jobs took us. Because plot and settings are closely woven together, readers pick up information about history, geography, natural science, and ways of living.

"In the 'Megan Parnell' series, the challenges of today are treated in a sensitive fashion. Sixteen-year-old Megan and her stepbrother Peter struggle to get along in their newly blended family. All of the stories deal with multiculturalism in some form. In some stories, racial prejudice and peer relationships are issues. In others, Megan and her friends learn about caring for the ecology, dealing with sexual misconduct, and handling philosophies that contradict what the Bible teaches. While being entertained and informed, readers also learn that Christian faith is a practical necessity for successfully navigating the shoals of adolescence..."

https://www.blogger.com/profile/05917561944785527342
(includes photo)

https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=inauthor:%22Joan+Rawlins+Biggar%22
(five synopses)

http://worldcat.org/identities/lccn-n90646390/
(eight synopses)

https://www.google.com/search?q=joan+biggar+books&biw=1920&bih=887&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiW8sbhyuXPAhUBCT4KHbZuB18Q_AUIBigB#tbm=isch&q=joan+rawlins+biggar+&imgrc=_
(a few book covers)

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/564942.Joan_Rawlins_Biggar
(same)

http://www.historylink.org/File/8494
(long essay by Biggar from 2008: "History, History Everywhere: A Remembrance of Growing Up in Snohomish County's Robe Valley" - that's in Washington State)

http://mountainloopexpress.com/archive-news/Volume-2-Issue-4.php?fn_mode=fullnews&fn_id=362
(article by Biggar on snow geese)

http://mountainloopexpress.com/archive-news/Volume-1-Issue-7.php?fn_mode=fullnews&fn_id=120
(high school reunion in maybe 2011 - she's the one in the black skirt, third from right)

http://rainsongpress.blogspot.com/2010/08/how-we-have-changed.html
(includes a picture of her at age 6)

http://mountainloopexpress.com/archive-news/columns.php?fn_mode=comments&fn_id=302
(about visiting Arizona)

http://threeminutestonine.blogspot.com/2011/07/take-note.html
(more on Biggar, written by a friend)

http://mountainloopexpress.com/sun-breaks-a-loggers-daughter/
(2014 article about a teacher of Biggar's)

Most of the second half:

...V.G., a loyal alumnus of the University of Washington, knew a lot about our local history. “Have you ever found fossils around here?” someone once asked at the beginning of Latin class. V.G. forgot the lesson plan and spent most of the class period telling us about the summer he helped lay out a road for the Forest Service and his discovery of rocks containing fossilized seashells on a nearby mountain. I was hooked on geology!

This proof that the very mountains where I lived were once part of an ancient ocean bed perhaps didn’t have much to do with learning a fossilized language. But as V.G. helped us uncover the Latin foundations of words we use every day, I learned that words had beauty, precision and power…concepts basic to my budding interest in writing.

Another day a student in geometry class winked at the rest of us. Then cleverly, (he thought) he distracted V.G. from the lesson at hand by asking if he’d ever met any of the Indians who once traveled the nearby rivers. V.G., allowing us to think he’d swallowed the bait, launched into a story about old Pilchuck Julia, nearly blind, who still lived near town when he was a young man. She wove beautiful baskets by touch. As my imagination reconstructed Pilchuck Julia’s lost culture, my interest in history and anthropology took root.

Often V.G. told tales of his pranks as an underclassman at the university in Seattle. He described the beautiful campus and the exciting mix of learning and fun. For most of us, college was not even a dream. But V.G.’s portrayal of college life opened up the world beyond our little logging town. Doing extra class work at home seemed an even exchange for his stories.

“Joan, where do you plan to go to college?” V.G. asked one day after geometry class.

“College?” I stammered. My parents struggled to feed and clothe us. College was out of the question.

“Yes,” V.G. replied. “You’re a good student. You can go far. You should be making plans for your future.”

That conversation started me dreaming. Maybe I could pursue an education. Maybe God would make a way. In many further conversations, V.G. lobbied hard for me to attend his beloved University of Washington. I chose a smaller, church-sponsored college instead. Nevertheless, he encouraged me to pursue my dreams and was pleased when I followed in his footsteps by graduating with my teaching degree.

V.G. lived by Galileo’s premise: “You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself.” I’ve forgotten most of what I knew of math and Latin, but by V.G.’s story telling, he taught us the power of story to spur accomplishment, to further cultural understanding, and to communicate ideas...

(end)

Under the name Joan Rawlins Husby, she wrote her memoir in 2008:

"Logger's Daughter: Growing Up in Washington's Woods"

http://www.marytrimblebooks.com/tag/joan-rawlings-husby/
(includes cover)

Excerpt:

"Joan Rawlins was born just months before her parents, Delbert and Marie Rawlins', moved from North Dakota to Washington's Robe Valley, at the foot of Mt. Pilchuck. The Rawlins lived in a tiny cabin until Joan's father could build a larger cabin of scrounged material. Eventually, the Rawlins had five children who played in the great outdoors with other loggers' children.

"Husby shares with readers a life of growing up in Washington's forests, the daughter of a logger. Although her parents didn't have a lot of ready cash and worked hard for every advantage they had, there was always food on the table and love to spare. The family was years in getting electricity and running water. Their "bathroom" was a two-holer a distance from the house. Heating fuel was wood, hand-cut and split. They raised chickens for eggs and meat, and rabbits for meat and skins to sell to Sears, Roebuck and Company..."

http://www.heraldnet.com/news/memoir-tells-mid-century-granite-falls-life/
(more on the same book)

http://rainsongpress.blogspot.com/
(from 2016 - her posts on microbursts, hummingbirds, a summer camp in Kako, Alaska, and romance in old age)


WRITINGS:
"ADVENTURE QUEST" SERIES; WITH TEACHER'S GUIDES

Treasure at Morning Gulch, illustrated by Kay Salem, Concordia (St. Louis, MO), 1991.
Danger at Half Moon Lake, illustrated by Salem, Concordia, 1991.
Shipwreck on the Lights, illustrated by Salem, Concordia, 1992.
High Desert Secrets, illustrated by Salem, Concordia, 1992.

"MEGAN PARNELL" MYSTERY SERIES; WITH TEACHER'S GUIDES

Missing on Castaway Island, Concordia, 1997.
Mystery at Camp Galena, Concordia, 1997.
Trouble in Yakima Valley, Concordia, 1998.
Trapped at Haunted Canyon, Concordia, 1998.



Lenona.
j***@gmail.com
2017-05-15 19:13:29 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
She lives in Stanwood, Washington.
Aka Joan Rawlins Biggar Husby, and Joan Rawlins-Husby, her name is pronounced "Joanne."
"...In each of my eight books Concordia has published, the story starts with an interesting setting somewhere in the Pacific Northwest (except for Trapped in Haunted Canyon, which is set in Arizona). Mostly these are areas where my husband's jobs took us. Because plot and settings are closely woven together, readers pick up information about history, geography, natural science, and ways of living.
"In the 'Megan Parnell' series, the challenges of today are treated in a sensitive fashion. Sixteen-year-old Megan and her stepbrother Peter struggle to get along in their newly blended family. All of the stories deal with multiculturalism in some form. In some stories, racial prejudice and peer relationships are issues. In others, Megan and her friends learn about caring for the ecology, dealing with sexual misconduct, and handling philosophies that contradict what the Bible teaches. While being entertained and informed, readers also learn that Christian faith is a practical necessity for successfully navigating the shoals of adolescence..."
https://www.blogger.com/profile/05917561944785527342
(includes photo)
https://www.google.com/search?tbo=p&tbm=bks&q=inauthor:%22Joan+Rawlins+Biggar%22
(five synopses)
http://worldcat.org/identities/lccn-n90646390/
(eight synopses)
https://www.google.com/search?q=joan+biggar+books&biw=1920&bih=887&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiW8sbhyuXPAhUBCT4KHbZuB18Q_AUIBigB#tbm=isch&q=joan+rawlins+biggar+&imgrc=_
(a few book covers)
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/564942.Joan_Rawlins_Biggar
(same)
http://www.historylink.org/File/8494
(long essay by Biggar from 2008: "History, History Everywhere: A Remembrance of Growing Up in Snohomish County's Robe Valley" - that's in Washington State)
http://mountainloopexpress.com/archive-news/Volume-2-Issue-4.php?fn_mode=fullnews&fn_id=362
(article by Biggar on snow geese)
http://mountainloopexpress.com/archive-news/Volume-1-Issue-7.php?fn_mode=fullnews&fn_id=120
(high school reunion in maybe 2011 - she's the one in the black skirt, third from right)
http://rainsongpress.blogspot.com/2010/08/how-we-have-changed.html
(includes a picture of her at age 6)
http://mountainloopexpress.com/archive-news/columns.php?fn_mode=comments&fn_id=302
(about visiting Arizona)
http://threeminutestonine.blogspot.com/2011/07/take-note.html
(more on Biggar, written by a friend)
http://mountainloopexpress.com/sun-breaks-a-loggers-daughter/
(2014 article about a teacher of Biggar's)
...V.G., a loyal alumnus of the University of Washington, knew a lot about our local history. “Have you ever found fossils around here?” someone once asked at the beginning of Latin class. V.G. forgot the lesson plan and spent most of the class period telling us about the summer he helped lay out a road for the Forest Service and his discovery of rocks containing fossilized seashells on a nearby mountain. I was hooked on geology!
This proof that the very mountains where I lived were once part of an ancient ocean bed perhaps didn’t have much to do with learning a fossilized language. But as V.G. helped us uncover the Latin foundations of words we use every day, I learned that words had beauty, precision and power…concepts basic to my budding interest in writing.
Another day a student in geometry class winked at the rest of us. Then cleverly, (he thought) he distracted V.G. from the lesson at hand by asking if he’d ever met any of the Indians who once traveled the nearby rivers. V.G., allowing us to think he’d swallowed the bait, launched into a story about old Pilchuck Julia, nearly blind, who still lived near town when he was a young man. She wove beautiful baskets by touch. As my imagination reconstructed Pilchuck Julia’s lost culture, my interest in history and anthropology took root.
Often V.G. told tales of his pranks as an underclassman at the university in Seattle. He described the beautiful campus and the exciting mix of learning and fun. For most of us, college was not even a dream. But V.G.’s portrayal of college life opened up the world beyond our little logging town. Doing extra class work at home seemed an even exchange for his stories.
“Joan, where do you plan to go to college?” V.G. asked one day after geometry class.
“College?” I stammered. My parents struggled to feed and clothe us. College was out of the question.
“Yes,” V.G. replied. “You’re a good student. You can go far. You should be making plans for your future.”
That conversation started me dreaming. Maybe I could pursue an education. Maybe God would make a way. In many further conversations, V.G. lobbied hard for me to attend his beloved University of Washington. I chose a smaller, church-sponsored college instead. Nevertheless, he encouraged me to pursue my dreams and was pleased when I followed in his footsteps by graduating with my teaching degree.
V.G. lived by Galileo’s premise: “You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself.” I’ve forgotten most of what I knew of math and Latin, but by V.G.’s story telling, he taught us the power of story to spur accomplishment, to further cultural understanding, and to communicate ideas...
(end)
"Logger's Daughter: Growing Up in Washington's Woods"
http://www.marytrimblebooks.com/tag/joan-rawlings-husby/
(includes cover)
"Joan Rawlins was born just months before her parents, Delbert and Marie Rawlins', moved from North Dakota to Washington's Robe Valley, at the foot of Mt. Pilchuck. The Rawlins lived in a tiny cabin until Joan's father could build a larger cabin of scrounged material. Eventually, the Rawlins had five children who played in the great outdoors with other loggers' children.
"Husby shares with readers a life of growing up in Washington's forests, the daughter of a logger. Although her parents didn't have a lot of ready cash and worked hard for every advantage they had, there was always food on the table and love to spare. The family was years in getting electricity and running water. Their "bathroom" was a two-holer a distance from the house. Heating fuel was wood, hand-cut and split. They raised chickens for eggs and meat, and rabbits for meat and skins to sell to Sears, Roebuck and Company..."
http://www.heraldnet.com/news/memoir-tells-mid-century-granite-falls-life/
(more on the same book)
http://rainsongpress.blogspot.com/
(from 2016 - her posts on microbursts, hummingbirds, a summer camp in Kako, Alaska, and romance in old age)
"ADVENTURE QUEST" SERIES; WITH TEACHER'S GUIDES
Treasure at Morning Gulch, illustrated by Kay Salem, Concordia (St. Louis, MO), 1991.
Danger at Half Moon Lake, illustrated by Salem, Concordia, 1991.
Shipwreck on the Lights, illustrated by Salem, Concordia, 1992.
High Desert Secrets, illustrated by Salem, Concordia, 1992.
"MEGAN PARNELL" MYSTERY SERIES; WITH TEACHER'S GUIDES
Missing on Castaway Island, Concordia, 1997.
Mystery at Camp Galena, Concordia, 1997.
Trouble in Yakima Valley, Concordia, 1998.
Trapped at Haunted Canyon, Concordia, 1998.
Lenona.
I just discovered this, Lenona. Thank you for all the research and for the birthay greeting. Who are you and why did you do this? Is it part of google groups? I'm just discovering them. Joan
l***@yahoo.com
2017-05-31 15:52:04 UTC
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Post by j***@gmail.com
I just discovered this, Lenona. Thank you for all the research and for the birthay greeting. Who are you and why did you do this? Is it part of google groups? I'm just discovering them. Joan
You're welcome! Thanks for writing.

Yes, it's part of Google Groups. Other places I post are:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/rec.arts.books.childrens
(aka r.a.b.c.)

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/alt.obituaries

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/rec.arts.sf.written

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/rec.arts.comics.strips

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/rec.arts.movies.past-films


In the last 12 years, I've posted birthday greetings for practically every juvenile writer or illustrator who had an 80th, 90th or 100th birthday in that time frame. (Of course, non-mystery writers do not get mentioned here at rec.arts.mystery - most of the birthday posts go to rabc.) Same goes for almost all the obituaries in that time.

I admit it's a compulsion of mine, but it's also good to let people know they can write to their favorite writers and artists! (Hope you got a few more letters as a result.) I have, in fact, heard from several people wanting to know how to contact their old colleagues in the business, such as Newbery Honor winner Sylvia Louise Engdahl, some years ago, asking for her old illustrator Ruth McCrea - and in 2013, Liam Francis Walsh (from the New Yorker) asked me how to contact Joseph Schindelman (illustrator of "Charlie & the Chocolate Factory") for an interview! That interview was printed in March 14, 2014 and it's called "I Still Enjoy What a Line Can Do."


If you like, here's a list of writers/illustrators over 90 (it's in two parts - the other part is writers-only, for adults):

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.arts.books.childrens/zhou%7Csort:relevance/rec.arts.books.childrens/h3zQTerErPA/Qhy9n58FFgAJ

I will update it in July and post it at rabc, alt.obits and the Community Forum at Abebooks (in the General category):

http://forums.abebooks.com/discussions/AbeBookscom_Community_Forum/abecom?

(There's also the Booksleuth forum at Abebooks, where people try to ID forgotten books):
http://forums.abebooks.com/discussions/AbeBookscom_BookSleuthreg/abesleuthcom?

Of course, since the list is from January, more than 20 people already, sadly, have to be removed. That includes the oldest people from both lists - Zhou Youguang (born in 1906), Chinese linguist and one of the main creators of pinyin, and Jean Fritz (born in 1915), history writer and National Humanities Medalist. Others are Nat Hentoff and Protestant mystery/adventure writer Lee Roddy. I will add two or three new names to the adult list and 18 names to the juvenile list in July. One of them, as you may have noticed in this newsgroup, is Vin Packer, aka Marijane Meaker and M.E. Kerr. (Also, note the three mystery writers born in 1926!)

Three REAL-life mysteries I'd like to solve are:

Is there any recent biographical information on "Peggy" mystery writer Dorothy M. Martin? (She was born in 1921.)

Is Edgar-winning writer Lillian Eige alive? (Born in 1915 - so, right now, I don't dare include her on the list!)

How did Barbara Ninde Byfield die? (She was 58 when she died in 1988.)


Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2017-05-31 19:48:40 UTC
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And...here are this year's anniversaries.

Btw, for more detailed individual lists, you can go to Wikipedia, search on any year you like, look under "(year) by topic" on the right, and click on Literature. For example, if you search on 1517 and do the above, you'll see three events, three books, three births, and one death. (The only names I recognized were Machiavelli and John Skelton.)



2500th death anniversary
Buddha (maybe)

2000th death anniversary
Ovid (maybe)

450th birth anniversary
Feb. Thomas Campion

350th birth anniversaries
Apr. John Arbuthnot
Nov. Jonathan Swift

300th birth anniversary
Sep. Horace Walpole

200th birth anniversaries
Apr. George Henry Lewes
July Henry David Thoreau
Nov. Edward Dalziel
Dec. James T. Fields

150th anniversary
Feb. "Peer Gynt" - first performance

150th birth anniversaries

William Trowbridge Larned (?)

Jan. Ruben Dario
Feb. Laura Ingalls Wilder
Mar. Lionel Johnson
Apr. Helen Stratton
Apr. A.E. (aka George William Russell, Irish poet)
June Luigi Pirandello
Aug. Ernest Dowson
Aug. Edith Hamilton
Aug. John Galsworthy
Sep. Charles Dana Gibson
Sep. Arthur Rackham

100th anniversaries
Jan. Peter Taylor
Feb. I.G. Edmonds
Feb. Carson McCullers
Feb. Jane Bowles
Feb. Anthony Burgess
Mar. Robert Lowell
Mar. Pascuala Corona
Apr. Robert Anderson
May Lillie Patterson
June Gwendolyn Brooks
June Bertrand Brinley
Aug. Barbara Cooney
Aug. Ruth Park
Sep. Louis Auchincloss
Nov. Erika Weihs
Nov. Dahlov Ipcar
Dec. Barbara Leonie Picard
Dec. Rhoda Blumberg
Dec. Arthur C. Clarke
Dec. Heinrich Böll

50th death anniversary
June Dorothy Parker


Lenona.

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