Discussion:
Hot Weather Means Lots of Reading and Reviews
(too old to reply)
Nyssa
2016-08-15 12:57:42 UTC
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Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several weeks,
I've been using the time to catch up on some of my reviewing
backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of them mysteries.

I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>

Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.

Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of exactly
how the murder was set up to look like an accident. I'll
be writing the review Real Soon Now as time and schedule
permit.

As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery series.
No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and pretty decent
mystery. I read it as an eARC from NetGalley so it's not a self-
published book, but from a real publishing house, the Alibi
imprint of Random House. I'll be posting my review on Amazon
tomorrow with a four-star rating.

Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as mysteries
Francis A. Miniter
2016-08-15 19:08:21 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several weeks,
I've been using the time to catch up on some of my reviewing
backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of them mysteries.
I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>
Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.
Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of exactly
how the murder was set up to look like an accident. I'll
be writing the review Real Soon Now as time and schedule
permit.
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery series.
No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and pretty decent
mystery. I read it as an eARC from NetGalley so it's not a self-
published book, but from a real publishing house, the Alibi
imprint of Random House. I'll be posting my review on Amazon
tomorrow with a four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as mysteries
Just keep repeating: "There is no global warming. Trump said it is a
hoax. Ten thousand climate scientists are all wrong."

It only hit 98 here in Connecticut yesterday. Of course, the humidity
was at 88%, so it felt like 112.


Francis A. Miniter
Nyssa
2016-08-15 23:27:11 UTC
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Post by Francis A. Miniter
Post by Nyssa
Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several
weeks, I've been using the time to catch up on some of my
reviewing backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of
them mysteries.
I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>
Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.
Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of
exactly how the murder was set up to look like an
accident. I'll be writing the review Real Soon Now as
time and schedule permit.
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery
series. No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and
pretty decent mystery. I read it as an eARC from
NetGalley so it's not a self- published book, but from a
real publishing house, the Alibi imprint of Random House.
I'll be posting my review on Amazon tomorrow with a
four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as
mysteries
Just keep repeating: "There is no global warming. Trump
said it is a
hoax. Ten thousand climate scientists are all wrong."
It only hit 98 here in Connecticut yesterday. Of course,
the humidity was at 88%, so it felt like 112.
Francis A. Miniter
I think we only made it to 106F heat index here today.
It was already 88F "real" temperature by 10am and rising
when I made a quick run into town for some errands.

Yesterday the "real" temperature got up to 99F, but I
was too frightened to check the heat index. I just know
it was like a sauna.

Good for reading and eating ice cream and not much else.

Nyssa, who has already done the latter and is planning on
starting a new book for the former this evening
p***@gmail.com
2016-08-16 06:17:49 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Nyssa
Post by Francis A. Miniter
Post by Nyssa
Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several
weeks, I've been using the time to catch up on some of my
reviewing backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of
them mysteries.
I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>
Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.
Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of
exactly how the murder was set up to look like an
accident. I'll be writing the review Real Soon Now as
time and schedule permit.
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery
series. No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and
pretty decent mystery. I read it as an eARC from
NetGalley so it's not a self- published book, but from a
real publishing house, the Alibi imprint of Random House.
I'll be posting my review on Amazon tomorrow with a
four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as
mysteries
Just keep repeating: "There is no global warming. Trump
said it is a
hoax. Ten thousand climate scientists are all wrong."
It only hit 98 here in Connecticut yesterday. Of course,
the humidity was at 88%, so it felt like 112.
Francis A. Miniter
I think we only made it to 106F heat index here today.
It was already 88F "real" temperature by 10am and rising
when I made a quick run into town for some errands.
Yesterday the "real" temperature got up to 99F, but I
was too frightened to check the heat index. I just know
it was like a sauna.
Good for reading and eating ice cream and not much else.
Nyssa, who has already done the latter and is planning on
starting a new book for the former this evening
Gee, I'm sorry for you all (snigger). Here in my aerie in the Rocky Mtns, it was 72F with 45% humidity. Only special-needs people have air-conditioning in their homes. AND, it doesn't get all that cold here in the winter. AND, we're on the east slope, not the crazy snowed-up west slope with all the ski resorts.

However, Nyssa, why did you have to remind me that I haven't had ice cream in way too long. Sigh

Pam J
Mike Burke
2016-08-16 00:30:01 UTC
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Post by Francis A. Miniter
Post by Nyssa
Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several weeks,
I've been using the time to catch up on some of my reviewing
backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of them mysteries.
I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>
Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.
Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of exactly
how the murder was set up to look like an accident. I'll
be writing the review Real Soon Now as time and schedule
permit.
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery series.
No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and pretty decent
mystery. I read it as an eARC from NetGalley so it's not a self-
published book, but from a real publishing house, the Alibi
imprint of Random House. I'll be posting my review on Amazon
tomorrow with a four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as mysteries
Just keep repeating: "There is no global warming. Trump said it is a
hoax. Ten thousand climate scientists are all wrong."
It only hit 98 here in Connecticut yesterday. Of course, the humidity
was at 88%, so it felt like 112.
Francis A. Miniter
Naughty, naughty, Francis. :-)
--
Mique
a***@yahoo.com
2016-08-24 19:31:47 UTC
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Post by Francis A. Miniter
Just keep repeating: "There is no global warming. Trump said it is a
hoax. Ten thousand climate scientists are all wrong."
It only hit 98 here in Connecticut yesterday. Of course, the humidity
was at 88%, so it felt like 112.
Recently Iran had a heat index of 160. The Red Sea was 90 degrees.
Francis A. Miniter
2016-08-25 01:31:33 UTC
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Post by a***@yahoo.com
Post by Francis A. Miniter
Just keep repeating: "There is no global warming. Trump said it is a
hoax. Ten thousand climate scientists are all wrong."
It only hit 98 here in Connecticut yesterday. Of course, the humidity
was at 88%, so it felt like 112.
Recently Iran had a heat index of 160. The Red Sea was 90 degrees.
Wow. Records are falling across the world. I heard that Israel had
some of its hottest temperatures as well.

Francis A. Miniter
Carol Dickinson
2016-08-21 01:46:45 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery series.
No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and pretty decent
mystery. I read it as an eARC from NetGalley so it's not a self-
published book, but from a real publishing house, the Alibi
imprint of Random House. I'll be posting my review on Amazon
tomorrow with a four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as mysteries
Crepes of Wrath? Didn't Tamar Myers write one by the same title recently?

I have pretty much given up on the genre involving food in any form. As long as the series protaganist is not 30 years old with a whole lot of angst baggage about the guy she left behind. All the new writer create that same character for cozies. And tell me there are no recipes in it, I might dare it.

As for bread maker. I haven't used mine for a while but its been staring at me lately. I try not to go down the mountain for groceries but twice a month so bread either gets stale or moldy the second week if I don't remember to put it in the fridge. So I've been thinking better to make my own. I have some really great recipes. If you want a couple of the best, let me know, and I'll send them. Probably better to do this through regular email rather than cluttering up RAM.

Carol
Nyssa
2016-08-21 13:36:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery
series. No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and
pretty decent mystery. I read it as an eARC from
NetGalley so it's not a self- published book, but from a
real publishing house, the Alibi imprint of Random House.
I'll be posting my review on Amazon tomorrow with a
four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as
mysteries
Crepes of Wrath? Didn't Tamar Myers write one by the same
title recently?
I have pretty much given up on the genre involving food in
any form. As long as the series protaganist is not 30
years old with a whole lot of angst baggage about the guy
she left behind. All the new writer create that same
character for cozies. And tell me there are no recipes in
it, I might dare it.
As for bread maker. I haven't used mine for a while but
its been staring at me lately. I try not to go down the
mountain for groceries but twice a month so bread either
gets stale or moldy the second week if I don't remember to
put it in the fridge. So I've been thinking better to make
my own. I have some really great recipes. If you want a
couple of the best, let me know, and I'll send them.
Probably better to do this through regular email rather
than cluttering up RAM.
Carol
There were a couple of recipes at the end of "Crepes of
Wrath" so I guess it's a no-go for you.

I agree about many of the newer cozy series. They seem like
cookie-cutter books, just change the names of the characters
and the flavor of the cupcake, and they pretty much follow
a formula. I've actually written that about a few recent
books in reviews. And the authors who "write" these marvels
seem to churn one out every couple of weeks, all with very
similar covers as well.

I've been attacking my mountains of DTBs for the last few
books I've read. There are some very good Kindle books out
there that I've gotten for free, but there are also some
*very* bad ones as well.

The authors who are releasing the first in their series for
free are smart. I read the first one (or sometimes more,
all having been free at some point) and then know whether
I'll like the series enough to actually pay money for the
rest. I usually buy the "real" books though, not the Kindle
ones. They are usually less expensive and then I can lend
them out more easily. That's how I found Shannon Hill's
Lil and Boris series and ended up buying them all in paper
copies...new and full price, too!

As for the bread machine recipes, I've made four loaves so
far in the machine. If you don't mind sending new ones to
me, my email address on my postings is un-munged and valid.
When I bake the old fashioned way, I usually cut the baked
loaves in two and then wrap and freeze them. Less chance of
the half loaf out on the counter going fuzzy (although in
this hot/humid sauna lately nothing is safe), and I can
have "fresh" bread by just thawing out a loaf from the freezer
when needed.

Nyssa, who is waiting for this heat wave to ease up enough
to restock her freezer with baked goods
Carol Dickinson
2016-08-22 04:39:00 UTC
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Raw Message
O
Post by Nyssa
There were a couple of recipes at the end of "Crepes of
Wrath" so I guess it's a no-go for you.
No 2 recipes won't kill me. Its just that some of them seem to be half cookbook.
The Susan Wittig Albert China Bayles series for instance. The one featuring Chili had dozens of recipes as did the one on Dill. And Valarie Wolzien has done that with more than one of her Penn-Dutch series. Although I put Wolzien in my list of top 5 favorite authors anyway, and Albert's historical series would be in the top 10.
Post by Nyssa
I agree about many of the newer cozy series. They seem like
cookie-cutter books, just change the names of the characters
and the flavor of the cupcake, and they pretty much follow
a formula.
Cookie cutter is exactly the phrase I should have use in my original post.

. There are some very good Kindle books out
Post by Nyssa
there that I've gotten for free, but there are also some
*very* bad ones as well.
Well when I researched ebooks after about 6 visits to stores, I settled on a Nook as it is NOT Amazon. I was told I could access all ebooks. Perhaps I could then, but now its limited to just Barns and Noble provided books. I tested the access with some obscure authors before I bought the darn thing and they showed me those authors in their database. But not now. And of the 6 books I ordered, I've read 2. There is gap in both my series. I ordered 2 others that came with a free book. I've spent a total of under $10 but 2 of my ordered books will not download. I've taken the nook into Barnes and Noble but the "nook guy" is there even though the schedules says he should be. Now the darn thing doesn't seem to want to turn on. So maybe I've wasted $80. But if the Nook doesn't like my disruptive electrical energy which blows up electronical devices, I'd have no luck if I did try to use a Kindle.
Post by Nyssa
As for the bread machine recipes, I've made four loaves so
far in the machine. If you don't mind sending new ones to
me, my email address on my postings is un-munged and valid.
Nyssa, who is waiting for this heat wave to ease up enough
I can't see your address Nyssa. Please drop me a note to ***@yahoo.com.

Carol
c***@gmail.com
2017-04-02 21:55:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Nyssa
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery
series. No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and
pretty decent mystery. I read it as an eARC from
NetGalley so it's not a self- published book, but from a
real publishing house, the Alibi imprint of Random House.
I'll be posting my review on Amazon tomorrow with a
four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as
mysteries
Crepes of Wrath? Didn't Tamar Myers write one by the same
title recently?
I have pretty much given up on the genre involving food in
any form. As long as the series protaganist is not 30
years old with a whole lot of angst baggage about the guy
she left behind. All the new writer create that same
character for cozies. And tell me there are no recipes in
it, I might dare it.
As for bread maker. I haven't used mine for a while but
its been staring at me lately. I try not to go down the
mountain for groceries but twice a month so bread either
gets stale or moldy the second week if I don't remember to
put it in the fridge. So I've been thinking better to make
my own. I have some really great recipes. If you want a
couple of the best, let me know, and I'll send them.
Probably better to do this through regular email rather
than cluttering up RAM.
Carol
There were a couple of recipes at the end of "Crepes of
Wrath" so I guess it's a no-go for you.
I agree about many of the newer cozy series. They seem like
cookie-cutter books, just change the names of the characters
and the flavor of the cupcake, and they pretty much follow
a formula. I've actually written that about a few recent
books in reviews. And the authors who "write" these marvels
seem to churn one out every couple of weeks, all with very
similar covers as well.
I've been attacking my mountains of DTBs for the last few
books I've read. There are some very good Kindle books out
there that I've gotten for free, but there are also some
*very* bad ones as well.
The authors who are releasing the first in their series for
free are smart. I read the first one (or sometimes more,
all having been free at some point) and then know whether
I'll like the series enough to actually pay money for the
rest. I usually buy the "real" books though, not the Kindle
ones. They are usually less expensive and then I can lend
them out more easily. That's how I found Shannon Hill's
Lil and Boris series and ended up buying them all in paper
copies...new and full price, too!
As for the bread machine recipes, I've made four loaves so
far in the machine. If you don't mind sending new ones to
me, my email address on my postings is un-munged and valid.
When I bake the old fashioned way, I usually cut the baked
loaves in two and then wrap and freeze them. Less chance of
the half loaf out on the counter going fuzzy (although in
this hot/humid sauna lately nothing is safe), and I can
have "fresh" bread by just thawing out a loaf from the freezer
when needed.
Nyssa, who is waiting for this heat wave to ease up enough
to restock her freezer with baked goods
c***@gmail.com
2017-04-02 21:55:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several weeks,
I've been using the time to catch up on some of my reviewing
backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of them mysteries.
I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>
Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.
Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of exactly
how the murder was set up to look like an accident. I'll
be writing the review Real Soon Now as time and schedule
permit.
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery series.
No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and pretty decent
mystery. I read it as an eARC from NetGalley so it's not a self-
published book, but from a real publishing house, the Alibi
imprint of Random House. I'll be posting my review on Amazon
tomorrow with a four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as mysteries
c***@gmail.com
2017-04-02 21:56:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Since this part of the world seems doomed to triple-digit
heat indexes with little relief over the past several weeks,
I've been using the time to catch up on some of my reviewing
backlog and doing a lot of reading, many of them mysteries.
I've bombed Amazon with almost two dozen reviews over the
past six weeks, but I still have a backlog to work on.
I've reviewed a number of mysteries including the first
four Blanco County books, various other mysteries and
thrillers, and a couple of non-fiction so far. Lots more
to catch up on. <sigh>
Last night I finished the first book in the Hunter Rayne
Highway Mystery series, "Slow Curve on the Coquihalla."
The main character is a retired RCMP detective who has
become a long-haul truck driver based in British Columbia
by R.E. Donald.
Good mystery, interesting characters, and the author's
descriptions of BC make me want to go out there and find
a cottage on one of their lakes. There seem to be four
books in the series so far. My only complaint is that I
could have used just a tad more of an explanation of exactly
how the murder was set up to look like an accident. I'll
be writing the review Real Soon Now as time and schedule
permit.
As for Carol D's cozy recommendations, a new series is
coming out tomorrow that might fit the requirements. It's
"Crepes of Wrath" by Sarah Fox and set in the Pacific
Northwest. It's the first in the Pancake House Mystery series.
No gushy love scenes, no foul language, and pretty decent
mystery. I read it as an eARC from NetGalley so it's not a self-
published book, but from a real publishing house, the Alibi
imprint of Random House. I'll be posting my review on Amazon
tomorrow with a four-star rating.
Nyssa, who also has a new toy to play with, an automatic
bread maker, so has been reading cookbooks as well as mysteries
Oh please are you kidding.

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