Discussion:
where is everyody?
(too old to reply)
Howard & Mary Duck
2017-04-12 03:47:45 UTC
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Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck

Howard Duck
Mike Burke
2017-04-12 05:47:44 UTC
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On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 22:47:45 -0500, Howard & Mary Duck
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on Facebook where
there is a Group for Past and present RAMmers.

I'm still here, and others post when they have something to say.

Mique

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Howard Duck
2017-04-12 09:38:49 UTC
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Post by Mike Burke
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 22:47:45 -0500, Howard & Mary Duck
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on Facebook where
there is a Group for Past and present RAMmers.
I'm still here, and others post when they have something to say.
Mique
Hi Mique,
I've become shy of Facebook. I may stick around here awhile before
checking that out then.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-04-12 12:45:38 UTC
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On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:47:44 +1000, Mike Burke
Post by Mike Burke
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 22:47:45 -0500, Howard & Mary Duck
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on
Facebook where there is a Group for Past and present
RAMmers.
I'm still here, and others post when they have something
to say.
Mique
Hi Mique,
I've become shy of Facebook. I may stick around here
awhile before checking that out then.
Howard
I'm allergic to Facebook and refuse to have anything to
do with it. I keep posting to various newsgroups to help
the cause of Usenet, but I fear it's a losing battle with
the younger folk who don't even know this exists.

Let's see. I've been reading (no surprise) "House of Cards"
and I'm waiting for the sequel to arrive to start that.
Of course, the third book in the series arrived yesterday,
but will have to wait its turn.

I've also read three more in the Knitting Mystery series
by Maggie Sefton, alternating the cozies with tougher
titles. Last night I finished "Skein of the Crime." The
mysteries are fair to middling, and I usually figure out
the perp well before the end, but the characters are good
and I'm enjoying their interactions, so it's all good.

I also finished a Kindle book "The Veritas Deception" that
seemed to be a political thriller from the short description,
but turned out to be an off-the-wall nuts conspiracy romp
with a lot of woo-woo hand-waving about the alleged magical
power of Judas's 30 silver coins and some super rich crazy
manipulating (and impregnating) a lot of people in his
search for the last ten of the coins. Oh yeah, and there
was a Nazi mad scientist too. <rolls eyes> It was painful,
but I actually finished the thing.

The Knitting cozies were a relief after that experience.

I haven't decided what's next up, but I'm leaning towards
either "Prague Fatale" by Philip Kerr or a non-fiction
while waiting for "To Play the King" in the House of Cards
series.

Nyssa, who hopes this posting will jumpstart some more in
followups or "currently reading" threads
Howard Duck
2017-04-12 22:19:37 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:47:44 +1000, Mike Burke
Post by Mike Burke
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 22:47:45 -0500, Howard & Mary Duck
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on
Facebook where there is a Group for Past and present
RAMmers.
I'm still here, and others post when they have something
to say.
Mique
Hi Mique,
I've become shy of Facebook. I may stick around here
awhile before checking that out then.
Howard
I'm allergic to Facebook and refuse to have anything to
do with it. I keep posting to various newsgroups to help
the cause of Usenet, but I fear it's a losing battle with
the younger folk who don't even know this exists.
Let's see. I've been reading (no surprise) "House of Cards"
and I'm waiting for the sequel to arrive to start that.
Of course, the third book in the series arrived yesterday,
but will have to wait its turn.
I've also read three more in the Knitting Mystery series
by Maggie Sefton, alternating the cozies with tougher
titles. Last night I finished "Skein of the Crime." The
mysteries are fair to middling, and I usually figure out
the perp well before the end, but the characters are good
and I'm enjoying their interactions, so it's all good.
I also finished a Kindle book "The Veritas Deception" that
seemed to be a political thriller from the short description,
but turned out to be an off-the-wall nuts conspiracy romp
with a lot of woo-woo hand-waving about the alleged magical
power of Judas's 30 silver coins and some super rich crazy
manipulating (and impregnating) a lot of people in his
search for the last ten of the coins. Oh yeah, and there
was a Nazi mad scientist too. <rolls eyes> It was painful,
but I actually finished the thing.
The Knitting cozies were a relief after that experience.
I haven't decided what's next up, but I'm leaning towards
either "Prague Fatale" by Philip Kerr or a non-fiction
while waiting for "To Play the King" in the House of Cards
series.
Nyssa, who hopes this posting will jumpstart some more in
followups or "currently reading" threads
Hi Nyssa,
I've watched some of the video series of House of Cards - American
version, with Kevin Spacey. Haven't read the books.

Been looking for another good cozy TV series that I haven't seen. I
think I may have seen all that is available. I am looking forward to
the new series of Bosch, which is not cozy of course, but I am so
familiar with the Connelly books. It'll be coming up on Amazon the
21st of April. I enjoy Titus Welliver in the role. I wish Nathaniel
Parker could do another series similar to Inspector Lynley.

They do so much hardcore police series. I get kinda sick of them.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-04-13 12:54:21 UTC
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On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 08:45:38 -0400, Nyssa
Post by Nyssa
On Wed, 12 Apr 2017 15:47:44 +1000, Mike Burke
Post by Mike Burke
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 22:47:45 -0500, Howard & Mary Duck
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on
Facebook where there is a Group for Past and present
RAMmers.
I'm still here, and others post when they have something
to say.
Mique
Hi Mique,
I've become shy of Facebook. I may stick around here
awhile before checking that out then.
Howard
I'm allergic to Facebook and refuse to have anything to
do with it. I keep posting to various newsgroups to help
the cause of Usenet, but I fear it's a losing battle with
the younger folk who don't even know this exists.
Let's see. I've been reading (no surprise) "House of
Cards" and I'm waiting for the sequel to arrive to start
that. Of course, the third book in the series arrived
yesterday, but will have to wait its turn.
I've also read three more in the Knitting Mystery series
by Maggie Sefton, alternating the cozies with tougher
titles. Last night I finished "Skein of the Crime." The
mysteries are fair to middling, and I usually figure out
the perp well before the end, but the characters are good
and I'm enjoying their interactions, so it's all good.
I also finished a Kindle book "The Veritas Deception" that
seemed to be a political thriller from the short
description, but turned out to be an off-the-wall nuts
conspiracy romp with a lot of woo-woo hand-waving about
the alleged magical power of Judas's 30 silver coins and
some super rich crazy manipulating (and impregnating) a
lot of people in his search for the last ten of the coins.
Oh yeah, and there was a Nazi mad scientist too. <rolls
eyes> It was painful, but I actually finished the thing.
The Knitting cozies were a relief after that experience.
I haven't decided what's next up, but I'm leaning towards
either "Prague Fatale" by Philip Kerr or a non-fiction
while waiting for "To Play the King" in the House of Cards
series.
Nyssa, who hopes this posting will jumpstart some more in
followups or "currently reading" threads
Hi Nyssa,
I've watched some of the video series of House of Cards -
American
version, with Kevin Spacey. Haven't read the books.
Been looking for another good cozy TV series that I
haven't seen. I
think I may have seen all that is available. I am looking
forward to the new series of Bosch, which is not cozy of
course, but I am so
familiar with the Connelly books. It'll be coming up on
Amazon the
21st of April. I enjoy Titus Welliver in the role. I
wish Nathaniel Parker could do another series similar to
Inspector Lynley.
They do so much hardcore police series. I get kinda sick
of them.
Howard
I haven't seen either TV version of "House of Cards," but
I knew it was a hot political thriller, so finally ordered
the (used copies...must be frugal!) books.

As for TV versions of anything, my TV can go for weeks without
being turned on. I simply prefer to read than to watch. I
don't have cable or satellite TV (why pay for something you're
not going to watch anyway?) and my Internet connection is
dialup, so no streaming anything either. I don't miss it at
all. When I do decide to watch something, it's a DVD from my
collection. No commercials, and I can start and stop it at
my whim.

I ended up opting for "A Question of Guilt" by Julianne
Lee as my next read. It's a historical fiction that looks
into the facts behind the accusation that Mary Queen of Scots
killed her husband, Lord Darnley. I'm only a couple of chapters
into it, but I'm hoping for something similar to Josephine
Tey's "Daughter of Time" that looked into the historical
facts of Richard III and the Tower Princes.

I'll report back on it when I'm done.

Oddly enough, that knitting cozy series I've been reading
has resulted in my starting and finishing several small
knitting projects, mostly hats for friends. There's something
about reading about the characters sitting around knitting
that pushes me to set the book aside awhile and knit. After
a bit of knitting, I go back to the book for a few chapters.
Nothing like getting a bonus out of reading a book or two.

Nyssa, who hopes her friends like their new hats
Howard Duck
2017-04-13 16:21:40 UTC
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Post by Nyssa
Oddly enough, that knitting cozy series I've been reading
has resulted in my starting and finishing several small
knitting projects, mostly hats for friends. There's something
about reading about the characters sitting around knitting
that pushes me to set the book aside awhile and knit. After
a bit of knitting, I go back to the book for a few chapters.
Nothing like getting a bonus out of reading a book or two.
Nyssa, who hopes her friends like their new hats
Sounds like my wife. She loves knitting too.

Howard
Mike Burke
2017-04-13 17:28:04 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Post by Nyssa
Oddly enough, that knitting cozy series I've been reading
has resulted in my starting and finishing several small
knitting projects, mostly hats for friends. There's something
about reading about the characters sitting around knitting
that pushes me to set the book aside awhile and knit. After
a bit of knitting, I go back to the book for a few chapters.
Nothing like getting a bonus out of reading a book or two.
Nyssa, who hopes her friends like their new hats
Sounds like my wife. She loves knitting too.
Howard
And mine. Winter's coming and knitting season is about to start.
--
Mique
Nyssa
2017-04-13 19:35:48 UTC
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Post by Mike Burke
On Thu, 13 Apr 2017 08:54:21 -0400, Nyssa
Post by Nyssa
Oddly enough, that knitting cozy series I've been
reading has resulted in my starting and finishing
several small knitting projects, mostly hats for
friends. There's something about reading about the
characters sitting around knitting that pushes me to set
the book aside awhile and knit. After a bit of knitting,
I go back to the book for a few chapters. Nothing like
getting a bonus out of reading a book or two.
Nyssa, who hopes her friends like their new hats
Sounds like my wife. She loves knitting too.
Howard
And mine. Winter's coming and knitting season is about to
start.
What size hats do you need? lol

Nyssa, who is enjoying the added benefit of using up a lot
of yarn for these projects that's been hiding in her closet
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-14 07:54:40 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Been looking for another good cozy TV series that I haven't seen. I
think I may have seen all that is available.
They do so much hardcore police series. I get kinda sick of them.
I recorded a Sherlock Holmes on PBS a couple days back and it I think is NEW episodes, at least I don't remember them, of the Jeremy Brett series. But isn't he dead?

And I looked to see if I'd set up a series recording and discovered, the Miss Fisher series 2013 is back on PBS also. They aren't "new" but they are not hardcore police, they are on the edge of cozy.

I can't remember if you are in the US. If you are, the Hallmark channel is running new episodes of the b grade mysteries. Several new this month. Mostly featuring blond women amateur detectives. And about 2 weeks ago they started airing Monk reruns. Not new, but I find them great the second time around because they are usually so funny also, and I don't always remember whodunnit. Sometimes I do but not always.

I can't remember if you were here for the Murdoch discussion a few weeks back. Ovation is running them as "The Artful Dectective" 1895 Toronto, police inspector with fatastical inventions before their time, kind of tongue in cheek, like silly putty, night vision goggles, lie detector. Quite humorous in most episodes though with a definite mystery to be solved.

Hope something here could satisfy.

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-04-14 09:12:33 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 00:54:40 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
I recorded a Sherlock Holmes on PBS a couple days back and it I think is NEW episodes, at least I don't remember them, of the Jeremy Brett series. But isn't he dead?
I have copies of all of these on disc. Don't know if Brett is dead,
but didn't care too much for his interpretation of Holmes. Some of
these later interpretations with Downey and Cumberbatch are just too
bizarre.
Post by Carol Dickinson
And I looked to see if I'd set up a series recording and discovered, the Miss Fisher series 2013 is back on PBS also. They aren't "new" but they are not hardcore police, they are on the edge of cozy.
Think I've caught all these on Netflix or Acorn via Roku. I wondered
if Australia had the 1920s flapper stereotype, Miss Fisher. Mique
said he wasn't aware of it.
Post by Carol Dickinson
I can't remember if you are in the US. If you are, the Hallmark channel is running new episodes of the b grade mysteries. Several new this month. Mostly featuring blond women amateur detectives. And about 2 weeks ago they started airing Monk reruns. Not new, but I find them great the second time around because they are usually so funny also, and I don't always remember whodunnit. Sometimes I do but not always.
Yes, I live in Texas. I seen a lot of these. Mystery Woman wasn't
bad; McBride was fun because of John Larroquette and the way they were
done. I may have to watch Monk; my wife loved them. I thoroughly
enjoyed the Eli Stone series, which weren't exactly mysteries - more
like fantasies, but I enjoy Victor Garber and Jonny Lee Miller. Btw,
Jonny Lee Miller did a version of Sherlock ("Elementary") which was
also bizarre but very novel I thought (Watson was a female therapist).
Post by Carol Dickinson
I can't remember if you were here for the Murdoch discussion a few weeks back. Ovation is running them as "The Artful Dectective" 1895 Toronto, police inspector with fatastical inventions before their time, kind of tongue in cheek, like silly putty, night vision goggles, lie detector. Quite humorous in most episodes though with a definite mystery to be solved.
You know? I've passed over these Murdoch Mysteries, on Acorn I think.
I'll have to check this out better. Thanks for the notice.
Post by Carol Dickinson
Hope something here could satisfy.
;-)

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-15 22:01:27 UTC
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And I looked to see if I'd set up a series recording and discovered, the Miss Fisher series 2013 is back on PBS also. They aren't "new" but they are not hardcore police, they are on the edge of cozy.
Post by Howard Duck
Think I've caught all these on Netflix or Acorn via Roku. I wondered
if Australia had the 1920s flapper stereotype, Miss Fisher. Mique
said he wasn't aware of it.
At the end of some of the Miss Fisher episodes, when they are aired on PBS, the author of the books makes comments. These are edited out on the other network so they can stuff in commercials.

She is apparently very fussy about sticking to the historical details. The thing is filmed in historical buildings, and all the small details have to be just so. She is very happy with the films. So I have assumed that at least Miss Fisher liked being a flapper. She has the attitude.

They do have a lot of historical stuff as background like how WWI changed a lot of things in the lives of the characters, such as her extended family, and many of her friends. The author says its 1928 and she wants everything to be to that exact year. That would become problematical after the 3rd season which is the one I think airing now. I haven't seen anything indicating they made a 4th season. How many murders can take place in one year. Pretty soon it would be like Cabot Cove which is why they had to move Jessica Fletcher to the big city
and send her on lots of trips.

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-04-15 22:51:49 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 15:01:27 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
And I looked to see if I'd set up a series recording and discovered, the Miss Fisher series 2013 is back on PBS also. They aren't "new" but they are not hardcore police, they are on the edge of cozy.
Post by Howard Duck
Think I've caught all these on Netflix or Acorn via Roku. I wondered
if Australia had the 1920s flapper stereotype, Miss Fisher. Mique
said he wasn't aware of it.
At the end of some of the Miss Fisher episodes, when they are aired on PBS, the author of the books makes comments. These are edited out on the other network so they can stuff in commercials.
She is apparently very fussy about sticking to the historical details. The thing is filmed in historical buildings, and all the small details have to be just so. She is very happy with the films. So I have assumed that at least Miss Fisher liked being a flapper. She has the attitude.
They do have a lot of historical stuff as background like how WWI changed a lot of things in the lives of the characters, such as her extended family, and many of her friends. The author says its 1928 and she wants everything to be to that exact year. That would become problematical after the 3rd season which is the one I think airing now. I haven't seen anything indicating they made a 4th season. How many murders can take place in one year. Pretty soon it would be like Cabot Cove which is why they had to move Jessica Fletcher to the big city
and send her on lots of trips.
Carol
Yeah, no kidding. Same with Midsommer Murders, Miss Marple, and
Frost.

Howard
Rik Shepherd
2017-04-16 16:39:40 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Yeah, no kidding. Same with Midsommer Murders, Miss Marple, and
Frost.
In Christie's original 12 Miss Marple novels only two cases actually take
place in St Mary Mead, and in one a body is found in St Mary Mead but wasn't
murdered there. I think that makes about four deaths, plus some in the
short stories. I'm not sure whether the more recent TV versions bothered
with all the hassle of finding different locations; they were to busy
improving Christie's stand alones by writing Miss Marple into them.

Midsommer Murders used to be goodish when it was actually based on the
original books, which didn't have murders evenly spaced out to occur just
before the adverts. I think another problem is that they don't - at least
when I last watched, which wasn't recently - do a very good job of showing
that the murders aren't supposed to be all happening in the same village.

Everyone praises Morse, but I read somewhere that an average episode of
Morse had roughly the same number of murders as the real city of Oxford had
in a decade.
Howard Duck
2017-04-16 19:23:30 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 17:39:40 +0100, "Rik Shepherd"
Post by Rik Shepherd
Post by Howard Duck
Yeah, no kidding. Same with Midsommer Murders, Miss Marple, and
Frost.
In Christie's original 12 Miss Marple novels only two cases actually take
place in St Mary Mead, and in one a body is found in St Mary Mead but wasn't
murdered there. I think that makes about four deaths, plus some in the
short stories. I'm not sure whether the more recent TV versions bothered
with all the hassle of finding different locations; they were to busy
improving Christie's stand alones by writing Miss Marple into them.
I guess you're right there. As I recall she doesn't appear in the
stories as written very much. Murder in the Caribbean was probably my
favorite story, and I think she had a more significant role there.
Post by Rik Shepherd
Midsommer Murders used to be goodish when it was actually based on the
original books, which didn't have murders evenly spaced out to occur just
before the adverts. I think another problem is that they don't - at least
when I last watched, which wasn't recently - do a very good job of showing
that the murders aren't supposed to be all happening in the same village.
The TV versions are entertaining, but I don't think they make it clear
if the murders are mostly interspersed among surrounding communities.
Post by Rik Shepherd
Everyone praises Morse, but I read somewhere that an average episode of
Morse had roughly the same number of murders as the real city of Oxford had
in a decade.
Probably right. Oxford is not that isolated, surely.

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-16 22:58:41 UTC
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I have my cable box set up to automatically record my shows because 1) I don't remember when the air and 2) I'm usually busy doing something else anyway. This is "breakup" in Alaska (the rest of you call it spring)and as the 2 feet of snow melt off my roof and splash to my frozen yard, the water takes the path of least resistance to the edge of my foundation on the house. When the put the new porch on 2 years ago, the punctured the plastic water barrier in 2 places so for the last 3 days and probably the next two, I spend my day vacuuming water off the basement floor where there is apparantly a crack in the seal.

Anyway it automatically recorded "Grandchester" yesterday on PBS. Seem to be only reruns. I found it last time on episode 3, so I don't know the beginning story, and that's the one that aired last night. So mayber 1 and 2 don't exist? But there are I think about 8 of them. Nice mysteries. A police inspector and a vicar? solve them together. I believe from the costumes they are set in the 1930's. Not sure what part of England.

Carol
Mike Burke
2017-04-16 02:09:11 UTC
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Post by Carol Dickinson
And I looked to see if I'd set up a series recording and discovered, the
Miss Fisher series 2013 is back on PBS also. They aren't "new" but they
are not hardcore police, they are on the edge of cozy.
Post by Howard Duck
Think I've caught all these on Netflix or Acorn via Roku. I wondered
if Australia had the 1920s flapper stereotype, Miss Fisher. Mique
said he wasn't aware of it.
At the end of some of the Miss Fisher episodes, when they are aired on
PBS, the author of the books makes comments. These are edited out on the
other network so they can stuff in commercials.
She is apparently very fussy about sticking to the historical details.
The thing is filmed in historical buildings, and all the small details
have to be just so. She is very happy with the films. So I have assumed
that at least Miss Fisher liked being a flapper. She has the attitude.
They do have a lot of historical stuff as background like how WWI changed
a lot of things in the lives of the characters, such as her extended
family, and many of her friends. The author says its 1928 and she wants
everything to be to that exact year. That would become problematical
after the 3rd season which is the one I think airing now. I haven't seen
anything indicating they made a 4th season. How many murders can take
place in one year. Pretty soon it would be like Cabot Cove which is why
they had to move Jessica Fletcher to the big city
and send her on lots of trips.
Carol
I'm ambivalent about the Fisher books and TV series, so I haven't persisted
with the series. I'm too young to remember the flapper era, but to the
extent that I can remember the later years, my impression is that during
those years Britain was the major cultural influence on Australia, and
American influence was minimal until WWII and later. So I don't think the
fl

It may well be true that Kerry Greenwood insists on period accuracy, but
she triggers my anachronism alarms too often to allow me to suspend my
disbelief. Back in those days, and for long afterwards, Australia was a
very staid paternalistic and mysogynistic society where an English blow-in
like Phrynne Fisher, particularly one as thoroughly amoral and apparently
promiscuous as she was, would not have been tolerated - particularly in
Victoria which was a very tightly straight-laced place indeed.
--
Mique
Nyssa
2017-04-16 13:29:05 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Mike Burke
Post by Carol Dickinson
And I looked to see if I'd set up a series recording and
discovered, the
Miss Fisher series 2013 is back on PBS also. They aren't
"new" but they are not hardcore police, they are on the
edge of cozy.
Post by Howard Duck
Think I've caught all these on Netflix or Acorn via
Roku. I wondered
if Australia had the 1920s flapper stereotype, Miss
Fisher. Mique said he wasn't aware of it.
At the end of some of the Miss Fisher episodes, when they
are aired on PBS, the author of the books makes comments.
These are edited out on the other network so they can
stuff in commercials.
She is apparently very fussy about sticking to the
historical details. The thing is filmed in historical
buildings, and all the small details have to be just so.
She is very happy with the films. So I have assumed that
at least Miss Fisher liked being a flapper. She has the
attitude.
They do have a lot of historical stuff as background like
how WWI changed a lot of things in the lives of the
characters, such as her extended family, and many of her
friends. The author says its 1928 and she wants
everything to be to that exact year. That would become
problematical after the 3rd season which is the one I
think airing now. I haven't seen anything indicating they
made a 4th season. How many murders can take place in one
year. Pretty soon it would be like Cabot Cove which is
why they had to move Jessica Fletcher to the big city and
send her on lots of trips.
Carol
I'm ambivalent about the Fisher books and TV series, so I
haven't persisted
with the series. I'm too young to remember the flapper
era, but to the extent that I can remember the later
years, my impression is that during those years Britain
was the major cultural influence on Australia, and
American influence was minimal until WWII and later. So I
don't think the fl
It may well be true that Kerry Greenwood insists on period
accuracy, but she triggers my anachronism alarms too often
to allow me to suspend my
disbelief. Back in those days, and for long afterwards,
Australia was a
very staid paternalistic and mysogynistic society where
an English blow-in like Phrynne Fisher, particularly one
as thoroughly amoral and apparently promiscuous as she
was, would not have been tolerated - particularly in
Victoria which was a very tightly straight-laced place
indeed.
That was pretty much my take on the Miss Fisher book I
read as well. I didn't care for it at all.

Unfortunately I preferred Greenwood's other mystery series
based around a artisan bakery in modern Melbourne, and that
one seems to have been abandoned in favor of the Fisher
series.

Too bad, but it's not like I can't find more than enough
other books to keep me busy.

Currently 2/3rds through "A Question of Guilt." It's okay,
but slow-moving and no where near as good as the similar
"Daughter of Time" historical mystery investigation.

Nyssa, who is hoping the second book in the House of Cards
series will be at the post office tomorrow
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-16 22:51:02 UTC
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my impression is that during those years Britain
Post by Nyssa
Post by Mike Burke
was the major cultural influence on Australia, and
American influence was minimal until WWII and later. So I
don't think the fl
It may well be true that Kerry Greenwood insists on period
accuracy, but she triggers my anachronism alarms too often
to allow me to suspend my
disbelief. Back in those days, and for long afterwards,
Australia was a
very staid paternalistic and mysogynistic society where
an English blow-in like Phrynne Fisher, particularly one
as thoroughly amoral and apparently promiscuous as she
was, would not have been tolerated - particularly in
Victoria which was a very tightly straight-laced place
indeed.
That was pretty much my take on the Miss Fisher book I
read as well. I didn't care for it at all.
I never read her books. I think the series does reflect that
Phryne Fisher is who she is because she lived in England, and
through the WWI in Europe. Other than her costumes and the
occasional background music by an American singer,I don't see
much that is too "American".

And yes she is totally immoral and promiscuous, but there
are character anomalies in any society in any period. So
I can go with the flow. I do find the relationship between
the police inspector and Phryne to be "odd" in this current
season. He has divorced his wife who has remarried and he
has made romantic gestures but in this new season he is
very polite with her and not warm at all. Of course, that
is a cozy genre near mandatory requirement. The romance angle
seems to be moved to the constable and Dot.

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-04-13 03:15:43 UTC
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Raw Message
BTW, as to Nathaniel Parker, there is a cozy book series called Three
Pines Mysteries based in Montreal by Louise Penny. I haven't read any
of her books, but one of them called, Still Life, with her detective
Inspector Gamache played by Parker was pretty good. I wish they would
produce the whole series of books with Parker in that role.

Howard
Nyssa
2017-04-13 13:07:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Howard Duck
BTW, as to Nathaniel Parker, there is a cozy book series
called Three
Pines Mysteries based in Montreal by Louise Penny. I
haven't read any of her books, but one of them called,
Still Life, with her detective
Inspector Gamache played by Parker was pretty good. I
wish they would produce the whole series of books with
Parker in that role.
Howard
Thanks for the pointer. I'll give the first in the series,
"Still Life" a try if I can find a cheap used copy. For
some reason her books seem to be priced higher than what
I'm used to seeing. Especially when you consider how low
the Canadian dollar is to the US dollar. lol

I used to spend a bit of time in Montreal back in my
younger day and enjoyed it immensely, so I'm hoping the
books will bring back some of those memories while I'm
doing the mystery thing.

Nyssa, who wouldn't mind going back up to Quebec for a
visit
Howard Duck
2017-04-14 00:21:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Post by Howard Duck
BTW, as to Nathaniel Parker, there is a cozy book series
called Three
Pines Mysteries based in Montreal by Louise Penny. I
haven't read any of her books, but one of them called,
Still Life, with her detective
Inspector Gamache played by Parker was pretty good. I
wish they would produce the whole series of books with
Parker in that role.
Howard
Thanks for the pointer. I'll give the first in the series,
"Still Life" a try if I can find a cheap used copy. For
some reason her books seem to be priced higher than what
I'm used to seeing. Especially when you consider how low
the Canadian dollar is to the US dollar. lol
I used to spend a bit of time in Montreal back in my
younger day and enjoyed it immensely, so I'm hoping the
books will bring back some of those memories while I'm
doing the mystery thing.
Nyssa, who wouldn't mind going back up to Quebec for a
visit
There are a few nice picturesque shots and the setting is in a remote
village in the Still Life video. I get most of my viewing from Time
Warner Cable via Roku. We subscribe to Netflix streaming, Amazon
Prime, Acorn, and one or two others. Plenty of viewing.

Howard
Francis A. Miniter
2017-04-14 03:00:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
Post by Howard Duck
BTW, as to Nathaniel Parker, there is a cozy book series
called Three
Pines Mysteries based in Montreal by Louise Penny. I
haven't read any of her books, but one of them called,
Still Life, with her detective
Inspector Gamache played by Parker was pretty good. I
wish they would produce the whole series of books with
Parker in that role.
Howard
Thanks for the pointer. I'll give the first in the series,
"Still Life" a try if I can find a cheap used copy. For
some reason her books seem to be priced higher than what
I'm used to seeing. Especially when you consider how low
the Canadian dollar is to the US dollar. lol
I used to spend a bit of time in Montreal back in my
younger day and enjoyed it immensely, so I'm hoping the
books will bring back some of those memories while I'm
doing the mystery thing.
Nyssa, who wouldn't mind going back up to Quebec for a
visit
I lived and studied in Toronto for seven years in the 1970s, returning
one weekend a month (and two weeks in the summer) to the USA to go to
National Guard drills. As to Montreal, on a visit in the 90s, I
discovered a plaque half way up the steps on Parc Mont Royal indicating
that the landscape architect who designed the park was none other than
Frederick Law Olmsted, like me a native of Hartford, Connecticut, who
was better known for designing Central Park in New York, the Biltmore
Estate in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Boston Common, among many
others.


Francis A. Miniter
Localhostess
2017-04-15 15:54:33 UTC
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I had a bit of fun reading about Olmsted on line, thanks to your post!
Post by Francis A. Miniter
I lived and studied in Toronto for seven years in the 1970s, returning
one weekend a month (and two weeks in the summer) to the USA to go to
National Guard drills. As to Montreal, on a visit in the 90s, I
discovered a plaque half way up the steps on Parc Mont Royal indicating
that the landscape architect who designed the park was none other than
Frederick Law Olmsted, like me a native of Hartford, Connecticut, who
was better known for designing Central Park in New York, the Biltmore
Estate in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Boston Common, among many
others.
Francis A. Miniter
Rik Shepherd
2017-04-16 16:43:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Howard Duck
BTW, as to Nathaniel Parker, there is a cozy book series called Three
Pines Mysteries based in Montreal by Louise Penny. I haven't read any
of her books, but one of them called, Still Life, with her detective
Inspector Gamache played by Parker was pretty good. I wish they would
produce the whole series of books with Parker in that role.
Parker did a reasonable job in the Still Life film, but no-one I know who
has read the books mistook him for Gamache for a second. The books get less
cosy as the series goes on, though the seeds of the bleaker stuff are
planted in the Still Life.
Howard Duck
2017-04-17 02:46:33 UTC
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Raw Message
On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 17:43:26 +0100, "Rik Shepherd"
Post by Rik Shepherd
Parker did a reasonable job in the Still Life film, but no-one I know who
has read the books mistook him for Gamache for a second. The books get less
cosy as the series goes on, though the seeds of the bleaker stuff are
planted in the Still Life.
No surprise there. I suppose David Jason was also an unlikely Frost
too. And, from what I hear, Diana Rigg was a very unlikely Mrs
Bradley.

Howard
Mike Burke
2017-04-17 05:31:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rik Shepherd
Post by Howard Duck
BTW, as to Nathaniel Parker, there is a cozy book series called Three
Pines Mysteries based in Montreal by Louise Penny. I haven't read any
of her books, but one of them called, Still Life, with her detective
Inspector Gamache played by Parker was pretty good. I wish they would
produce the whole series of books with Parker in that role.
Parker did a reasonable job in the Still Life film, but no-one I know who
has read the books mistook him for Gamache for a second. The books get less
cosy as the series goes on, though the seeds of the bleaker stuff are
planted in the Still Life.
I have to say that I'm not a great fan of Parker in the Three Pines series.
I liked him much better in the Inspector Lynley series although that was
stolen lock, stock and barrel by Sharon Small. He's definitely nothing
like Gamache, but then who would be? And last I looked, Penny's latest
Gamache was still not available on Kindle. Bah!
--
Mique
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-14 07:40:59 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Nyssa
was a Nazi mad scientist too. <rolls eyes> It was painful,
but I actually finished the thing.
Why? Don't you know about the 50 page rule? You made me laugh out loud girl.

Carol
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-14 07:38:16 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Howard Duck
Post by Mike Burke
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on Facebook where
there is a Group for Past and present RAMmers.
I'm still here, and others post when they have something to say.
Mique
Hi Mique,
I've become shy of Facebook. I may stick around here awhile before
checking that out then.
Howard
Someone assisted me on joining RAM Past etc on Facebook. And there are posts but it seems to me its more quiet than this. I'm here but I'm still reading all 10,000 pages of Diana Gabaldon's series straight through, which was supposed to get me through to Season 3 which was supposed to start this month. But they've postponed it until September. I am going to DIE! trying to survive what fans call Draughtlander. I was on a fan facebook page for a while which helped. It did a lot of book discussion and jokes only fans would get, but it started to feel like I was back in Jr High and I didn't do well there when I was the correct age.

I did do one post on her Lord John Mysteries which sit in the middle of book 3. But right now I don't have anything mystery book wise to share. I have responded to other posts. I only have about 800 pages left in the last book so I should have something to say about amystery in about 2 weeks. Stick around for that Howard. Don't want to lose you.
Howard Duck
2017-04-14 08:36:52 UTC
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Raw Message
On Fri, 14 Apr 2017 00:38:16 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Someone assisted me on joining RAM Past etc on Facebook. And there are posts but it seems to me its more quiet than this. I'm here but I'm still reading all 10,000 pages of Diana Gabaldon's series straight through, which was supposed to get me through to Season 3 which was supposed to start this month. But they've postponed it until September. I am going to DIE! trying to survive what fans call Draughtlander. I was on a fan facebook page for a while which helped. It did a lot of book discussion and jokes only fans would get, but it started to feel like I was back in Jr High and I didn't do well there when I was the correct age.
I did do one post on her Lord John Mysteries which sit in the middle of book 3. But right now I don't have anything mystery book wise to share. I have responded to other posts. I only have about 800 pages left in the last book so I should have something to say about amystery in about 2 weeks. Stick around for that Howard. Don't want to lose you.
Thanks Carol. The Lord John Mysteries is included in book 3
(Voyager)? Apparently the Outlander series crosses a number of genre
- am I right about that?

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-15 21:43:20 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Thanks Carol. The Lord John Mysteries is included in book 3
(Voyager)? Apparently the Outlander series crosses a number of genre
- am I right about that?
Howard
Not exactly correct Howard. "Voyager" is the 3rd BEB (Big Enormous Book) in Gabaldon's series. The basic plot is that in book 1 "Outlander" Claire, a WWII combat nurse accidentally falls through time to 1743, where she is immediately accosted and nearly raped by her husbands ancestor, but is rescued by a band of (sort of) outlaws who carry her off so she can't get back to the time portal. Eventually they marry her off to Jamie, nephew of the Laird of the MacKenzie Clan. She falls in love with him after the forced marriage and stays with him. They get trapped in the Jacobite rising which takes place through most of book 2 "Dragonfly in Amber". At the end he is doomed to die at Culloden, so he takes her to the time portal and sends her back to the 20th century and her previous husband because she is pregnant and doesn't want her to suffer through the terrible things that happened in Scotland after the defeat because he won't be there to protect her, and he wants her and the child to live.

In "Voyager" 20 years have passed, the daughter is grown and Claire wants to find out what happened to the men she knew in the Jacobite army and through research discovers that Jamie did not die at Culloden and could still be alive in his own time, so she goes back to find him and does.

MEANWHILE Lord John has his own life in the head of Gabaldon. Lord John has met Jamie and Claire in book 2, for a brief hour or so, when while with the British army he spies Jamie, tries to kill him but Jamie breaks his arm instead. John is 16 at the time, so Jamie sends him back to the British camp under embarrassing circumstances and John carries a grudge for several years. There is an ongoing relationship between Lord John and Jamie through all the BEBS. Their friendship is off again on again for 30 years (so far).

But Gabaldon also wrote a couple novellas and some short stories featuring John and his military career (with mysteries both short and a couple that carry through his entire life and aren't even resolved yet as of the last BEB). All the stories featuring Lord John fit between when Claire is sent back to the 20th century and when she returns to the 18th century to reunite with Jamie. They are set in Canada, Germany and Jamaica.

The Outlander series is considered not to fit in any genre because it features as the main driver the romance between Jamie and Claire (but does not fit the required romance genre features) historical stuff like the Jacobite rebellion of 45, and the American Revolution but does not really pay attention to battles their outcomes but only throws in the bits that affect her characters.

There is a LOT of sex which reads like soft porn, There is lot of debate among fans whether it is porn. Anybody who was here when I was hanging around some years back knows I avoid books with gay characters because most of them write from an agenda perspective. There are maybe 5 authors I've found who write them just as people. There are a LOT of gay characters in the Gabaldon series. John is gay. He has lots of gay lovers, some of whom hang around in several books. Gabaldon write explicit gay love scenes, and they are not offensive.

The sci-fi angle because of the time travel etc. She doesn't just send her character through time. By the end of the written story so far she has at least 15 people who time travel. The daughter Brianna and her spouse are actively exploring how the time travel works. The daughter is an engineer (in the 20th century). Her spouse is a historian and teaches at Oxford in the 20th century and a minister in the 18th. They are writing a book about the time travel for their children so the sci-fi part is strong in the last 2 BEBs. There is also in the Lord Johns a story about zombies and another about a succubus. I am not into sci-fi but these were good reads.

Even in the BEBs which are not mysteries, there are storylines which aren't finished because Gabaldon is writing #9 which will be published next year and then there will be a #10 which supposedly will explain them at last. Although it takes her about 4 years to write a BEB so we don't expect to see the solution to the mysteries for about 5 or 6 more years, assuming she lives that long. She is my age.

And despite all I have shared here, I have not written any spoilers in terms of anyone enjoying the series which right now runs about 10,000 pages although there is another book of SLINs and Bulges to be published in June. SLINs are novels or novellas and Bulges are short stories of BEB characters that don't fit in the main BEBs.

Her books are filled with humorous bits and pieces and make delightful reading because there is a surprise in every chapter even if you've read it before. With 10,000 pages you just can't remember all of it. If this intrigues anyone but they aren't interested in 10,000 pages the first 2 books have been filmed under the title "Outlander". Season one is being aired on Starz right now. Episode 7 aired last night and will be available through On Demand, probably until September. I believe that on the fan pages folks outside the US say its available elsewhere. People in Australia and the UK are watching the reruns now. And it "might" be available on Netflix. I can't remember exactly. The fan base is extremely large and the Facebook pages are filled with thousands of women drooling over the actor who plays Jamie. Its like being back in Jr High and I wasn't good at that the first time. So I can't spend much time there.

There are a total of 29 episodes so far. Season 3 starts in September (that is the Voyager season). If you watch and like the series, you can still read the books and find a whole lot of story not on screen. Only about a 3rd or half of the books made it on screen. They left out 800 pages of "Dragonfly in Amber". The story is of course slightly different between the screen and the books as a result. Unlike many books turned to film where people say "book is better" so I never see the films, this one seems to please most fans although there are discussion on the fan pages about the changed scenes. Many like the film scenes better.

And so yet again, I post about my favorite author. Hope I'm not annoying anyone with repetition.

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-04-15 23:42:00 UTC
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Raw Message
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 14:43:20 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Howard Duck
Thanks Carol. The Lord John Mysteries is included in book 3
(Voyager)? Apparently the Outlander series crosses a number of genre
- am I right about that?
Howard
Not exactly correct Howard. "Voyager" is the 3rd BEB (Big Enormous Book) in Gabaldon's series. The basic plot is that in book 1 "Outlander" Claire, a WWII combat nurse accidentally falls through time to 1743, where she is immediately accosted and nearly raped by her husbands ancestor, but is rescued by a band of (sort of) outlaws who carry her off so she can't get back to the time portal. Eventually they marry her off to Jamie, nephew of the Laird of the MacKenzie Clan. She falls in love with him after the forced marriage and stays with him. They get trapped in the Jacobite rising which takes place through most of book 2 "Dragonfly in Amber". At the end he is doomed to die at Culloden, so he takes her to the time portal and sends her back to the 20th century and her previous husband because she is pregnant and doesn't want her to suffer through the terrible things that happened in Scotland after the defeat because he won't be there to protect her, and he wants her and the child to
live.
In "Voyager" 20 years have passed, the daughter is grown and Claire wants to find out what happened to the men she knew in the Jacobite army and through research discovers that Jamie did not die at Culloden and could still be alive in his own time, so she goes back to find him and does.
MEANWHILE Lord John has his own life in the head of Gabaldon. Lord John has met Jamie and Claire in book 2, for a brief hour or so, when while with the British army he spies Jamie, tries to kill him but Jamie breaks his arm instead. John is 16 at the time, so Jamie sends him back to the British camp under embarrassing circumstances and John carries a grudge for several years. There is an ongoing relationship between Lord John and Jamie through all the BEBS. Their friendship is off again on again for 30 years (so far).
But Gabaldon also wrote a couple novellas and some short stories featuring John and his military career (with mysteries both short and a couple that carry through his entire life and aren't even resolved yet as of the last BEB). All the stories featuring Lord John fit between when Claire is sent back to the 20th century and when she returns to the 18th century to reunite with Jamie. They are set in Canada, Germany and Jamaica.
The Outlander series is considered not to fit in any genre because it features as the main driver the romance between Jamie and Claire (but does not fit the required romance genre features) historical stuff like the Jacobite rebellion of 45, and the American Revolution but does not really pay attention to battles their outcomes but only throws in the bits that affect her characters.
There is a LOT of sex which reads like soft porn, There is lot of debate among fans whether it is porn. Anybody who was here when I was hanging around some years back knows I avoid books with gay characters because most of them write from an agenda perspective. There are maybe 5 authors I've found who write them just as people. There are a LOT of gay characters in the Gabaldon series. John is gay. He has lots of gay lovers, some of whom hang around in several books. Gabaldon write explicit gay love scenes, and they are not offensive.
The sci-fi angle because of the time travel etc. She doesn't just send her character through time. By the end of the written story so far she has at least 15 people who time travel. The daughter Brianna and her spouse are actively exploring how the time travel works. The daughter is an engineer (in the 20th century). Her spouse is a historian and teaches at Oxford in the 20th century and a minister in the 18th. They are writing a book about the time travel for their children so the sci-fi part is strong in the last 2 BEBs. There is also in the Lord Johns a story about zombies and another about a succubus. I am not into sci-fi but these were good reads.
Even in the BEBs which are not mysteries, there are storylines which aren't finished because Gabaldon is writing #9 which will be published next year and then there will be a #10 which supposedly will explain them at last. Although it takes her about 4 years to write a BEB so we don't expect to see the solution to the mysteries for about 5 or 6 more years, assuming she lives that long. She is my age.
And despite all I have shared here, I have not written any spoilers in terms of anyone enjoying the series which right now runs about 10,000 pages although there is another book of SLINs and Bulges to be published in June. SLINs are novels or novellas and Bulges are short stories of BEB characters that don't fit in the main BEBs.
Her books are filled with humorous bits and pieces and make delightful reading because there is a surprise in every chapter even if you've read it before. With 10,000 pages you just can't remember all of it. If this intrigues anyone but they aren't interested in 10,000 pages the first 2 books have been filmed under the title "Outlander". Season one is being aired on Starz right now. Episode 7 aired last night and will be available through On Demand, probably until September. I believe that on the fan pages folks outside the US say its available elsewhere. People in Australia and the UK are watching the reruns now. And it "might" be available on Netflix. I can't remember exactly. The fan base is extremely large and the Facebook pages are filled with thousands of women drooling over the actor who plays Jamie. Its like being back in Jr High and I wasn't good at that the first time. So I can't spend much time there.
There are a total of 29 episodes so far. Season 3 starts in September (that is the Voyager season). If you watch and like the series, you can still read the books and find a whole lot of story not on screen. Only about a 3rd or half of the books made it on screen. They left out 800 pages of "Dragonfly in Amber". The story is of course slightly different between the screen and the books as a result. Unlike many books turned to film where people say "book is better" so I never see the films, this one seems to please most fans although there are discussion on the fan pages about the changed scenes. Many like the film scenes better.
And so yet again, I post about my favorite author. Hope I'm not annoying anyone with repetition.
Carol
Thanks for the synopsis of this unusual series Carol. Seems unusual
for an American writer. I'm going to try to see what I can of the
videos. I wouldn't make it with that many pages, plus they don't seem
to be available for Kindle and my eyes are none too strong for the
printed page now.

The Brits seem to be big on the time travel genre (Dr Who). I enjoyed
the American series called "Life on Mars". It ran about 3 seasons I
think and had a more or less rational conclusion (disappointing). It
was entertaining but nothing like your Outlander series.

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-16 22:43:48 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Thanks for the synopsis of this unusual series Carol. Seems unusual
for an American writer. I'm going to try to see what I can of the
videos. I wouldn't make it with that many pages, plus they don't seem
to be available for Kindle and my eyes are none too strong for the
printed page now.
Actually on the Facebook fan pages lots of people mention reading them on their Kindle. Maybe that's just the BEBs and not the Lord Johns. There are audios. Lots of people mention listening to them while driving. I COULD NOT listen to the porn stuff while driving. Its distracting enough just seeing the video or reading them. I guarantee you though if you are in hospice and hoping to depart, that series would probably take you a long way down that road. I started reading the series straight through on January 8. I read about 200 pages a day and am now almost to the end of the last book. Only about 400 pages to go.
Post by Howard Duck
The Brits seem to be big on the time travel genre (Dr Who).
Funny you should mention that. The way the whole Outlander saga began was that when Gabaldon was 35, she says she had a sort of epiphany. She was already a very accomplished woman but had always wanted to write a novel. And she remembered a famous composer (don't remember which one) died at that age so she thought she better get started.

She was primarily a scientist and a professor, but had been writing for Disney comics as well. So she decided to write a practice novel to learn how to write one, just for herself. She had just watched an episode of Dr who that featured a highlander so she started there, imagining the hero Jamie, a highlander. After she had written a lot of it, I forget just how but it came to the attention of someone who thought it should be published. I do not watch Dr. Who, but I know that the program gets mentioned in the Outlander series a few times in #8 "Written in My Own Hearts Blood" because some of the characters are living in the 1980's. Jamie and Claire though are still living in the 18th century 1778, the Revolutionary War.

Carol

Carol
Howard Duck
2017-04-17 03:11:14 UTC
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 15:43:48 -0700 (PDT), Carol Dickinson
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Howard Duck
Thanks for the synopsis of this unusual series Carol. Seems unusual
for an American writer. I'm going to try to see what I can of the
videos. I wouldn't make it with that many pages, plus they don't seem
to be available for Kindle and my eyes are none too strong for the
printed page now.
Actually on the Facebook fan pages lots of people mention reading them on their Kindle. Maybe that's just the BEBs and not the Lord Johns. There are audios. Lots of people mention listening to them while driving. I COULD NOT listen to the porn stuff while driving. Its distracting enough just seeing the video or reading them. I guarantee you though if you are in hospice and hoping to depart, that series would probably take you a long way down that road. I started reading the series straight through on January 8. I read about 200 pages a day and am now almost to the end of the last book. Only about 400 pages to go.
Wow, you fast readers are amazing. But I like to savor each word it
seems. Must be the love of poetry, even though I can't claim to be
that well read in the art.
Post by Carol Dickinson
Post by Howard Duck
The Brits seem to be big on the time travel genre (Dr Who).
Funny you should mention that. The way the whole Outlander saga began was that when Gabaldon was 35, she says she had a sort of epiphany. She was already a very accomplished woman but had always wanted to write a novel. And she remembered a famous composer (don't remember which one) died at that age so she thought she better get started.
She was primarily a scientist and a professor, but had been writing for Disney comics as well. So she decided to write a practice novel to learn how to write one, just for herself. She had just watched an episode of Dr who that featured a highlander so she started there, imagining the hero Jamie, a highlander. After she had written a lot of it, I forget just how but it came to the attention of someone who thought it should be published. I do not watch Dr. Who, but I know that the program gets mentioned in the Outlander series a few times in #8 "Written in My Own Hearts Blood" because some of the characters are living in the 1980's. Jamie and Claire though are still living in the 18th century 1778, the Revolutionary War.
Carol
Goodness! What talent there lies. Where does it come from, as Scott
Joplin's publisher said about him.

Howard
Carol Dickinson
2017-04-19 11:18:38 UTC
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Post by Howard Duck
Goodness! What talent there lies. Where does it come from, as Scott
Joplin's publisher said about him.
Howard
She must be born with it. And she is brilliant and full of energy.

At this moment she is in South Africa at the place they film "Black Sails" because "Outlander season 3 Voyager" is using the same ship and pond to their series. She wears a couple of hats on the production. She is a consultant for sure, contributing a LOT of input into the changes that must be made from a 1000 page book to a 13 hours series because so much has to be left out. She is also doing promos for the series for all the various countries it will be broadcast in.

She hasn't finished writing "Seven Stones" which will be published in 60 days, and she is still working on #9 "Don't Tell the Bees". She makes daily posts on Facebook about what she is doing in South Africa and posts a smidgeon of something from "Bees".

Also she attends all the conventions that the "Outlander" cast attends, all the award shows, (and there are several of those that "Outlander is up for a win). The cast sponsor a lot of different charities, which she also makes a point of supporting. And of course she has a husband and children.

She reads and REPLIES to posts from her fans, constantly. There was a photo shared on a fan page of her standing between the actors who play Jamie and Claire. She came to about their waist, and I commented that I don't remember her being that short and she even replied to that.

Maybe she doesn't sleep. She is my age (69) but looks 20 years younger. A very blessed woman. Her books are published in over 30 languages, she has millions of readers. And her husband is apparently a real gem. Some of the romantic lines Jamie says to Claire actually come from things he has said to her.

Carol

Francis A. Miniter
2017-04-14 02:47:04 UTC
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Post by Mike Burke
On Tue, 11 Apr 2017 22:47:45 -0500, Howard & Mary Duck
Post by Howard & Mary Duck
Is RAM dead?
Howard Duck
On life support, Howard. Most of the action is on Facebook where
there is a Group for Past and present RAMmers.
I'm still here, and others post when they have something to say.
Mique
---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Hello. I have been reading books a lot, thinking a lot, reading the
posts here a lot, but have had a quiet period for posting. In part, I
suppose that is because a lot of my reading has been in books far from
the usual scope of interest here. Not all though.

The books on the far end include the following:

Israel Finkelstein, The Bible Unearthed. This is written by the
Director of the Archaeology Institute at Tel Aviv University and
presents what archaeology has to say about the historicity of claims in
the Deuteronomistic History, i.e., the Books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel
(I and II) and Kings (I and II). It concludes that most of the
historical claims in these books were simply false, and that the purpose
of the history was as propaganda, to enhance the stature of Josiah, in
whose reign it was written (rather like Shakespeare giving Richard III a
hunchback to please the Tudors). For instance, it was claimed that
Solomon built a magnificent temple in Jerusalem and an even bigger
palace in the 10th C BCE. But archaeological digs have found nothing of
stone at all that is earlier than the 8th C.

Jody Gentian Bower, Jane Eyre's Sisters: How Women Live and Write the
Heroine's Story. Bower is a specialist in mythological studies with an
emphasis on depth psychology. The book is a feminist response to Joseph
Campbell's 1949 book, The Hero With a Thousand Faces, which explored the
archetype of the hero (of which Frodo in The Lord of the Rings is a
perfect example), whose story can be summarized as follows: the call
(from outside by a wizard, a giant or a hologram) and acceptance of the
call, initiation, commencement of the quest, comrades and a wise man to
guide (Gandalf, Dumbledore, Obi Wan) but who leaves the hero at a
crucial point in time, crisis which the hero has to face alone, (near)
death and resurrection, and return to help the community with what has
been learned on the quest. Bower points out that while this is all well
and good for the masculine archetype, it does nothing for the feminine
side, who in these stories is often part of the prize for the hero. She
calls as witness the failure of Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz to be taken
seriously upon her return, breaking the mold of the hero in so doing.
Women, Bower claims, follow a different pattern, not one of quest and
return, but always one of moving away like an arrow and not returning.

I have been reading a couple of mystery novels by Benjamin Black
(pseudonym for the Irish novelist John Banville). These are Christine
Falls and The Silver Swan. I finished the first and am reading the
second. I was inspired to read these after watching the three episodes
of the Quirke series on PBS about a year or two ago. It starred Gabriel
Byrne as Quirke, Michael Gambon as his father, Nick Dunning as Quirke's
half-brother, Brian Gleeson (as the Garda) and Geralding Somerville as
Sarah, married to Quirke's brother. This is one of the rare cases where
seeing the film beforehand actually enhances the reading experience.
Why? Because the writing is so subtle, so beautiful, so significant
once you know what is coming much later, perhaps in the next novel, that
it would be a shame to miss it. And you would. If you don't watch the
films, you have to read the books twice after finishing at least the
third book (Elegy for April). The setting is Dublin in about 1957 and
thereafter, though the first novel makes a side trip to Boston. Quirke
spent his first nine years or so in an Irish orphanage. Sadly, as I
finished the first novel, I read about the finding of a mass grave in
one of those infamous Irish orphanages in Galway.

I will probably have more to say about the Quirke novels in future
posts. I have more ruminating to do, and perhaps yet another read of
Christine Falls.


Francis A. Miniter
Howard Duck
2017-04-14 08:19:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 13 Apr 2017 22:47:04 -0400, "Francis A. Miniter"
Post by Francis A. Miniter
Hello. I have been reading books a lot, thinking a lot, reading the
posts here a lot, but have had a quiet period for posting. In part, I
suppose that is because a lot of my reading has been in books far from
the usual scope of interest here. Not all though.
Israel Finkelstein, The Bible Unearthed. This is written by the
Director of the Archaeology Institute at Tel Aviv University and
presents what archaeology has to say about the historicity of claims in
the Deuteronomistic History, i.e., the Books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel
(I and II) and Kings (I and II). It concludes that most of the
historical claims in these books were simply false, and that the purpose
of the history was as propaganda, to enhance the stature of Josiah, in
whose reign it was written (rather like Shakespeare giving Richard III a
hunchback to please the Tudors). For instance, it was claimed that
Solomon built a magnificent temple in Jerusalem and an even bigger
palace in the 10th C BCE. But archaeological digs have found nothing of
stone at all that is earlier than the 8th C.
Jody Gentian Bower, Jane Eyre's Sisters: How Women Live and Write the
Heroine's Story. Bower is a specialist in mythological studies with an
emphasis on depth psychology. The book is a feminist response to Joseph
Campbell's 1949 book, The Hero With a Thousand Faces, which explored the
archetype of the hero (of which Frodo in The Lord of the Rings is a
perfect example), whose story can be summarized as follows: the call
(from outside by a wizard, a giant or a hologram) and acceptance of the
call, initiation, commencement of the quest, comrades and a wise man to
guide (Gandalf, Dumbledore, Obi Wan) but who leaves the hero at a
crucial point in time, crisis which the hero has to face alone, (near)
death and resurrection, and return to help the community with what has
been learned on the quest. Bower points out that while this is all well
and good for the masculine archetype, it does nothing for the feminine
side, who in these stories is often part of the prize for the hero. She
calls as witness the failure of Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz to be taken
seriously upon her return, breaking the mold of the hero in so doing.
Women, Bower claims, follow a different pattern, not one of quest and
return, but always one of moving away like an arrow and not returning.
Jung wrote a study on the hero archetype in fairy tales: the least
expected to succeed who nevertheless does succeed over his would-be
betters.
Post by Francis A. Miniter
I have been reading a couple of mystery novels by Benjamin Black
(pseudonym for the Irish novelist John Banville). These are Christine
Falls and The Silver Swan. I finished the first and am reading the
second. I was inspired to read these after watching the three episodes
of the Quirke series on PBS about a year or two ago. It starred Gabriel
Byrne as Quirke, Michael Gambon as his father, Nick Dunning as Quirke's
half-brother, Brian Gleeson (as the Garda) and Geralding Somerville as
Sarah, married to Quirke's brother. This is one of the rare cases where
seeing the film beforehand actually enhances the reading experience.
Why? Because the writing is so subtle, so beautiful, so significant
once you know what is coming much later, perhaps in the next novel, that
it would be a shame to miss it. And you would. If you don't watch the
films, you have to read the books twice after finishing at least the
third book (Elegy for April). The setting is Dublin in about 1957 and
thereafter, though the first novel makes a side trip to Boston. Quirke
spent his first nine years or so in an Irish orphanage. Sadly, as I
finished the first novel, I read about the finding of a mass grave in
one of those infamous Irish orphanages in Galway.
I will probably have more to say about the Quirke novels in future
posts. I have more ruminating to do, and perhaps yet another read of
Christine Falls.
I must watch for this Quirke series!
Howard
Post by Francis A. Miniter
Francis A. Miniter
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