Discussion:
Favorite books from 2003
(too old to reply)
Mary Reagan
2003-12-19 18:53:42 UTC
Permalink
Now that the year is almost over I thought it would be a good time to put
together a list of RAMs favorite books from the past year. I already know
what's at the top of Ali's list, but I'm sure there will be some surprises.

So here are two questions:

1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?

2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?

I'm still working on my list.

Mary
Beth Tindall
2003-12-19 20:40:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Laura Lippman, Every Secret Thing
Lynn Hightower, Fortunes of the Dead
Stuart Kaminsky, Midnight Pass
Terry Devane, A Stain Upon the Robe
Rick Riordan, Cold Springs
(honorable mention: L.T. Fawkes, Cold Slice)
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'll have to answer this later, because I can't think of any right now.

Beth
Fran Read
2003-12-19 21:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beth Tindall
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Laura Lippman, Every Secret Thing
Lynn Hightower, Fortunes of the Dead
Stuart Kaminsky, Midnight Pass
Terry Devane, A Stain Upon the Robe
Rick Riordan, Cold Springs
(honorable mention: L.T. Fawkes, Cold Slice)
There's a new Lynn Hightower????
Fran (thrilled)
Greenbanks
2003-12-19 23:44:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fran Read
There's a new Lynn Hightower????
Fran (thrilled)
I finished it last night -- it might make my top-5 list, but I'm still
thinking....

M'Lou
Mary Reagan
2003-12-19 21:22:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beth Tindall
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Laura Lippman, Every Secret Thing
Lynn Hightower, Fortunes of the Dead
Stuart Kaminsky, Midnight Pass
Terry Devane, A Stain Upon the Robe
Rick Riordan, Cold Springs
(honorable mention: L.T. Fawkes, Cold Slice)
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'll have to answer this later, because I can't think of any right now.
Beth
I'll try to keep track of people's responses and post a list after the new
year.

Mary
vj
2003-12-20 01:28:59 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
<***@ldeo.columbia.edu> :

]I'll try to keep track of people's responses and post a list after the new
]year.

and i'll find a prominent place for it on BnB.


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Naomi Darvell
2003-12-19 20:45:28 UTC
Permalink
x-no-archive: yes

You know what, I think the only 2003 mysteries I have in the house are The Last
Place, The Rottweiler and Babes in the Wood. All of which I loved and which
would probably make it onto a favorites list even if I were more up to date.

I have a feeling most of the other mysteries I'm thinking of as newish actually
came out in 2002. I am completely maxed out on my book storage space, so I have
to depend on the library, and it's just easier if you stay about a year behind.



Naomi D.
Bridget
2003-12-20 03:34:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Naomi Darvell
x-no-archive: yes
You know what, I think the only 2003 mysteries I have in the house are The Last
Place, The Rottweiler and Babes in the Wood. All of which I loved and which
would probably make it onto a favorites list even if I were more up to date.
I have a feeling most of the other mysteries I'm thinking of as newish actually
came out in 2002. I am completely maxed out on my book storage space, so I have
to depend on the library, and it's just easier if you stay about a year behind.
Naomi D.
I'm very bad about not paying attention to when a book was publishes
so I don't feel qualified to answer the wonderful questions posed.

So, I'll just take note.
B.
ric
2003-12-20 03:44:26 UTC
Permalink
I'm not sure I read anything published in 2003 unless it was Long December
which is a fggod read. Two others I read this year that stand out (but not
published in 2003) were Gun Monkeys and The Good German.
--
Ric
ric
2003-12-20 03:47:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by ric
I'm not sure I read anything published in 2003 unless it was Long December
which is a fggod read. Two others I read this year that stand out (but not
published in 2003) were Gun Monkeys and The Good German.
--
Ric
Err that was good read, as in good book......
--
Ric
Barbara
2003-12-20 13:56:35 UTC
Permalink
Rick Mofina, No Way Out
David Baldacci Split Second
Lee Child Persuader
Laura Lippman, Every Secret Thing
I for get the author, Monkee Wrench
Barb
Beth Tindall
2003-12-20 14:41:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Barbara
Rick Mofina, No Way Out
Superb book -- great series! A favorite of mine!

(hellova nice guy too)

Beth
Naomi Darvell
2003-12-19 20:49:35 UTC
Permalink
x-no-archive: yes
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
Oh wow. That would be difficult. I was dazzled by Donna Leon's Acqua Alta--
first one I've read by her and it will not be the last. I'm sure I read at
least one apiece by each of my 10-12 favorite authors, but I couldn't begin to
rank those.




Naomi D.
Sarah Weinman
2003-12-19 21:22:38 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 13:53:42 -0500, Mary Reagan
Post by Mary Reagan
Now that the year is almost over I thought it would be a good time to put
together a list of RAMs favorite books from the past year. I already know
what's at the top of Ali's list, but I'm sure there will be some surprises.
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Can't narrow it down to five. Nope. Can't do it. My faves are in
January Mag's "Best of" or "Gift Books" lists though....
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
This I'll answer, in no particular order:

THE BUTCHER'S BOY, Thomas Perry
THE FOURTH DURANGO, Ross Thomas
MR. WHITE'S CONFESSION, Robert Clark
THE LAND OF LAUGHS/BONES OF THE MOON, Jonathan Carroll (brilliant,
brilliant writer, and I thank Thalia much for hooking me on his work.)
BY GRAND CENTRAL STATION I SAT DOWN AND WEPT, Elizabeth Smart (because
it wrenches your gut and tortures your soul. Amazing piece of poetic
prose.)

Sarah
Confessions of an Idiosyncratic Mind:
http://sarahweinman.blogspot.com

sarah AT weinmans DOT com
Donna
2003-12-19 22:12:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'm away at the moment and that makes this both easier and harder -
easier because I'm haiving to trust to memory, and harder
because...well...because I'm having to trust to memory :o) Oh, and I'm
numerically challenged :o)

So, my 5 favourites published in 2003:

Eddie Muller - Shadow Boxer
David Corbett - Done For a Dime
John Baker - The Meanest Flood
Barbara Seranella - Unpaid Dues
Ken Bruen - Killing of The Tinkers
Bill Fitzhugh - Heart Seizure
Joe Lansdale - A Fine Dark Line

Favourites read but not published in 2003:

Eddie Muller - The Distance
Ken Bruen - The White Trilogy
Christopher Moore - Lamb
Sean Doolittle - Dirt
Paula Woods - Inner City Blues

Tata,

Donna
Mary Reagan
2003-12-20 00:10:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Donna
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'm away at the moment and that makes this both easier and harder -
easier because I'm haiving to trust to memory, and harder
because...well...because I'm having to trust to memory :o) Oh, and I'm
numerically challenged :o)
Eddie Muller - Shadow Boxer
David Corbett - Done For a Dime
John Baker - The Meanest Flood
Barbara Seranella - Unpaid Dues
Ken Bruen - Killing of The Tinkers
Bill Fitzhugh - Heart Seizure
Joe Lansdale - A Fine Dark Line
Eddie Muller - The Distance
Ken Bruen - The White Trilogy
Christopher Moore - Lamb
Sean Doolittle - Dirt
Paula Woods - Inner City Blues
Tata,
Donna
Donna, you have great taste in books. I love Eddie's books, they will
definitely make my list and I'm a new convert to Bill Fitzhugh. I haven't
read Sean's yet - but they are on my Christmas list. As is Lamb, one of the
Christopher Moore books that somehow I've never managed to buy, even though
its been on my list for ages. I've just started Barbara's books, so I
haven't gotten to Unpaid Dues. And John is on my list of authors to check
out. I'll have to add your others to the list as well.

Looks like we agree in books just as in music.

Mary
Donna
2003-12-20 09:23:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
Donna, you have great taste in books. I love Eddie's books, they will
definitely make my list and I'm a new convert to Bill Fitzhugh. I haven't
read Sean's yet - but they are on my Christmas list. As is Lamb, one of the
Christopher Moore books that somehow I've never managed to buy, even though
its been on my list for ages. I've just started Barbara's books, so I
haven't gotten to Unpaid Dues. And John is on my list of authors to check
out. I'll have to add your others to the list as well.
Oh, you'll LOVE John Baker. And LAMB is very, very funny and clever.
Post by Mary Reagan
Looks like we agree in books just as in music.
Well, I shall look forward to seeing YOUR list of favourites :o)

On the music front, as well as Aerial Love Feed my other new favourite
of the moment is Sea Ray (who I think are from NY also. Great stuff.
They have a wonderful track called Revelry which I love. Last week I
bought Muse (I love Our Time is Running Out), The Distillers and an
older one by The Coral that I hadn't got round to buying earlier. And
WOXY are playing a great range of tracks that I love such as Rancid's
Red Hot Moon, Ballboy's Where Do The Nights of Sleep Go To When They Do
Not Come To me, Cracker's It Ain's Gonna Suck Itself, Stellastar*'s
Jenny and Basement Jaxx and Siouxsie Sioux with Cish Cash. I could go
on, but I'll shut up :o)

Tata,

Donna
--
http://freespace.virgin.net/donna.moore
Greenbanks
2003-12-20 00:17:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Karin Slaughter, A Faint Cold Fear
Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time
Nevada Barr, Seeking Enlightenment Hat by Hat
Lynn Hightower, Fortunes of the Dead
Jane Haddam, Consipiracy Theory
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?

Haven Kimmel, A Girl Named Zippy
Eve Ensler, The Vagina Monologues
Terry Pratchett, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents
John Irving, A Prayer for Owen Meany*
Eric Garcia, Matchstick Men

I could have listed more than five, but I've always been known for my tendency
to follow the rules.

*Judi sent this to me a long time ago and I read it very slowly because it's so
good and I liked to digest a portion as I would read it. So I finally finished
the book this year.

M'Lou
Bridget
2003-12-20 03:36:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Greenbanks
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Karin Slaughter, A Faint Cold Fear
Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time
Nevada Barr, Seeking Enlightenment Hat by Hat
Lynn Hightower, Fortunes of the Dead
Jane Haddam, Consipiracy Theory
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
Haven Kimmel, A Girl Named Zippy
Eve Ensler, The Vagina Monologues
Terry Pratchett, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents
John Irving, A Prayer for Owen Meany*
Eric Garcia, Matchstick Men
I could have listed more than five, but I've always been known for my tendency
to follow the rules.
*Judi sent this to me a long time ago and I read it very slowly because it's so
good and I liked to digest a portion as I would read it. So I finally finished
the book this year.
M'Lou
That book should be a must read for all.

There are few books that still stay with me.

This would be one of them.

B.
ian
2003-12-20 03:01:29 UTC
Permalink
Mary Reagan wrote:

Thanks for asking, and volunteering to keep track. Its difficult to
confine the list to 5 books (published in previous years, since I rarely
read hardbacks). Here's the top five, and then the runners' up, not in
order:

TOP FIVE:
Kazuo Ishiguru A Pale View Of The Hills
Dan Fesperman Lie In The Dark
Lee Child Without Fail
Simon Kernick The Business of Dying
Robert Caro The Path To Power

BUBBLING UNDER:
Joseph Kanon Los Alamos
Toby Litt Corpsing
David Corbett The Devil's Redhead
Robert Wilson A Small Death in Lisbon
Tom Bradby The Master of Rain
Arthur Nersesian Chinese Takeout
Mary Reagan
2003-12-20 05:19:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by ian
Thanks for asking, and volunteering to keep track. Its difficult to
confine the list to 5 books (published in previous years, since I rarely
read hardbacks). Here's the top five, and then the runners' up, not in
Kazuo Ishiguru A Pale View Of The Hills
Dan Fesperman Lie In The Dark
Lee Child Without Fail
Simon Kernick The Business of Dying
Robert Caro The Path To Power
Joseph Kanon Los Alamos
Toby Litt Corpsing
David Corbett The Devil's Redhead
Robert Wilson A Small Death in Lisbon
Tom Bradby The Master of Rain
Arthur Nersesian Chinese Takeout
Los Alamos was a great book. I've always been interested in the story of the
development of the atom bomb in Santa Fe. The book did a great job of
combining that with the mystery. It was a little like the movie Fat Man
Little Boy with Paul Newman and John Cusack.

Mary
vj
2003-12-20 05:22:03 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
<***@ldeo.columbia.edu> :

]1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
]
]2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
]what were your favorite five?

no way i could handle those limits. **sigh**

i'll wait for your combined list, Mary, and then post it on BnB.


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
SheepTP
2003-12-20 12:50:37 UTC
Permalink
Ok, not 100% sure that all of these were published in 2003, but whatever:

Small Town - Lawrence Block
Cold Springs - Rick Riordan
Dead Famous - Ben Elton
Lazybones - Mark Billingham
The Chandler Apartments - Owen Hill

Oldies:
Coffin's Got etc/Trouble Comes Back - Keith Snyder
Fingersmith - Sarah Waters
Holes - Louis Sacher
The Wooden Sea - Jonathan Carroll
The Basic Eight - Daniel Handler

Hurrah for Sarah getting into Jonathan Carroll! Now everyone has to.

Thalia
Randy Money
2003-12-24 20:18:34 UTC
Permalink
***@aol.com (SheepTP) wrote in message news:<***@mb-m18.aol.com>...

[...]
Post by SheepTP
Hurrah for Sarah getting into Jonathan Carroll! Now everyone has to.
Thalia
I'll second that. Anyone interested should dig for _The Land of
Laughs_, his first and one of the best mystery/fantasy/horror novels
I've read. (No, not fantasy with elves and giants and trolls, and, no,
not horror with blood and guts -- it's sharp, smart, well-written and
creepy.)

Randy M.
Luke Croll
2003-12-20 13:25:50 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 13:53:42 -0500, Mary Reagan
Post by Mary Reagan
Now that the year is almost over I thought it would be a good time to put
together a list of RAMs favorite books from the past year. I already know
what's at the top of Ali's list, but I'm sure there will be some surprises.
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Unfortunately, having spent so much time in France and Spain this
year, my reading has been a bit limited. There have been some books
that I am waiting to get hold of: SHUTTER ISLAND, PREY and many more,
but I just haven't had the chance. This makes my list a bit short:

A FINE DARK LINE - Joe R. Lansdale (not really a mystery, but
brilliant)

THE BLIND MAN OF SEVILLE - Robert Wilson

PERSUADER - Lee Child

LAZYBONES - Mark Billingham

There are many other books that I've read this year and the reviews
have appeared at Reviewing The Evidence and Murder & Mayhem Bookclub,
but there's nothing else that I would call standout, excellent
fiction.
--
Luke Croll
ABDK FAQ:
http://home.earthlink.net/~abdk-faq/faq.htm
Greenbanks
2003-12-20 16:58:39 UTC
Permalink
You know, I look at other lists and think... I would probably have included
that* in my top five, if I'd read it.

So next year, it'll go on my "published before 2004" list.

*several titles, actually

M'Lou
K Barrett
2003-12-20 17:39:59 UTC
Permalink
Favs from 2003

Mark Haddon's 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time' (I like
this one so much I gave it to my family for Xmas presents.)
The Mme. Ramotswe books
Harry Potter (5th)
'The Lovely Bones' (or was that last year? Nevertheless it was great.)

K Barrett
Bridget
2003-12-20 19:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by K Barrett
Favs from 2003
Mark Haddon's 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time' (I like
this one so much I gave it to my family for Xmas presents.)
Didn't realize that was from 2003.
Okay..I have one down...four to go :-)
B.
Melissa
2003-12-20 19:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bridget
Post by K Barrett
Favs from 2003
Mark Haddon's 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time' (I like
this one so much I gave it to my family for Xmas presents.)
Didn't realize that was from 2003.
Okay..I have one down...four to go :-)
B.
We're reading this one for our book club in January.

Melissa
Michelle Martin
2003-12-20 19:46:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
Now that the year is almost over I thought it would be a good time to put
together a list of RAMs favorite books from the past year. I already know
what's at the top of Ali's list, but I'm sure there will be some surprises.
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
Midnight Harvest, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
A Fine Dark Line, Joe Lansdale
Close to Home, Peter Robinson
Lazybones, Mark Billingham
The Devil in the White City, Erik Larson

(Just missed list: The Murder Room, P.D. James)
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'm just listing the books I read for the first time, and not re-reads:

Scaredy Cat, Mark Billingham
Everything's Eventual, Stephen King
The Crimson Petal & and The White, Michel Faber
Kisscut, Karin Slaughter
A Cold Heart, Jonathan Kellerman
Post by Mary Reagan
I'm still working on my list.
Mary
Michelle
--
Day Eleven: Bumped into Gandalf who is all sparkly white now. Asked him, "Who do
you have to blow to get last bottle of bleach in Middle Earth anyway?" Gandalf
said, "The Balrog." So not worth it. -- Legolas: The Very Secret Diaries
Fran Read
2003-12-20 22:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
A Fine Dark Line - Joe Lansdale
Lazybones - Mark Billingham
Close to Home (The Summer That Never Was) - Peter Robinson
A Fist Full of Rain - Greg Rucka
Distant Echo - Val McDermid
Missing - Karin Alvtegan
On Dangerous Ground - Lesley Horton
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
Snares of Guilt - Lesley Horton
The Fallen - Robert Rennick
The No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency - Alexander McCall
For Whom the Minivan Rolls - Jeffrey Cohen
Somebody Else's Music - Jane Haddam

Fran (having trouble counting)
Annie C
2003-12-20 20:51:11 UTC
Permalink
"Mary Reagan" <***@ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote in message news:BC08B366.2BDC7%***@ldeo.columbia.edu...
|
| 1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?

I'll just list the mysteries....

Shutter Island - Dennis Lehane
A Question of Blood - Ian Rankin
Lazybones - Mark Billingham
Every Secret Thing - Laura Lippman
The Distant Echo - Val McDermid

(and sixth is Blacklist - Sarah Paretsky..
very worthy, had to get it in here.. :)

| 2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
| what were your favorite five?

The Guards - Ken Bruen
Ice Harvest - Scott Phillips
Deeper Shade of Blue - Paul Johnston
Black & Blue + Beggar's Banquet - Ian Rankin
The Rival Queens - Fidelis Morgan

A top ten in each category would have been much easier..
This has certainly been a great reading year!

Annie
Mary Reagan
2003-12-20 22:16:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
|
| 1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
I'll just list the mysteries....
Shutter Island - Dennis Lehane
A Question of Blood - Ian Rankin
Lazybones - Mark Billingham
Every Secret Thing - Laura Lippman
The Distant Echo - Val McDermid
(and sixth is Blacklist - Sarah Paretsky..
very worthy, had to get it in here.. :)
| 2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
| what were your favorite five?
The Guards - Ken Bruen
Ice Harvest - Scott Phillips
Deeper Shade of Blue - Paul Johnston
Black & Blue + Beggar's Banquet - Ian Rankin
The Rival Queens - Fidelis Morgan
A top ten in each category would have been much easier..
This has certainly been a great reading year!
Annie
No reason not to list ten. When has RAM ever paid attention to rules.

Mary
Bridget
2003-12-20 22:37:53 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 17:16:45 -0500, Mary Reagan
Post by Mary Reagan
No reason not to list ten. When has RAM ever paid attention to rules.
Mary
Wellll...Rule # 32.b in section 8 states....oh..."don't pay attention
to rules."
Phew.
B.
A R Pickett
2003-12-21 15:21:37 UTC
Permalink
Mary inquired - > 1) What are your five favorite books that were published
in 2003?

"THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHTTIME" Mark Haddon far& away
the best read of 2003

Rest of top five - in no particular order "SPIES" by Michael Frayn
"EVERY SECRET THING" by Laura Lippman
"LAND THAT MOVES, LAND THAT STANDS STILL" by Kent Nelson
"THE NAMESAKE" by Jhumpa Lahiri
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I can give you three, in no particular order

"DEATH MINUS ZERO" by John Baker
"MAN OF PROPERTY" by John Galsworthy
"POWER OF THE DOG" by Thomas Savage
--
A R Pickett aka Woodstock

"He that loves reading has everything within his reach."
William Godwin

Remove lower case "e" to respond
K Barrett
2003-12-21 16:50:41 UTC
Permalink
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?

Stephen Booth's 'Blood on the Tongue'
Barbara Seranella's 'No Human Involved'
Richard Rennick's 'The Fallen' - if you are unfamiliar with the Isle of
Wight do a google search and discover this interesting island. It will
increase your liking for the book.
Thomas Perry's Jane Whitfield novels. About a Seneca woman who makes people
disappear

K Barrett
Mary Reagan
2003-12-23 18:30:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
Now that the year is almost over I thought it would be a good time to put
together a list of RAMs favorite books from the past year. I already know
what's at the top of Ali's list, but I'm sure there will be some surprises.
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'm still working on my list.
Mary
Well since I asked the question I guess I really should give my answers.
Problem is that I'm way behind on my reading lately and I haven't read that
many books that came out in 2003. So I'm modifying my question just a bit.

None of the lists are in any special order

Favorite 2003 books:

The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
Crouching Buzzard, Leaping Lizard by Donna Andrews

Books that came out in 2003 that I think would have been on the list if I
had gotten by act together and read them:

Shadow Boxer by Eddie Muller
Close to Home by Peter Robinson
Lost in a Good Book by Jasper Fforde
Blind to the Bones by Stephen Booth
Conspiracy Theory by Jane Haddam
Lazybones by Mark Billingham
Burn by Sean Doolittle

The worst of it is that I own all but the last book (and its on my Christmas
list). Gotta try to get to some of them over the holidays.

And finally, my favorite older books that I read in 2003:

Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde
The Distance by Eddie Muller
Black Dog by Stephen Booth
Precious Blood by Jane Haddam
Pest Control by Bill Fitzhugh


And of course I'm sure that there are others that I'm just not remembering
at the moment.

Mary
Annie C
2003-12-23 19:21:13 UTC
Permalink
"Mary Reagan" <***@ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote in message news:BC0DF3EA.2C2C9%***@ldeo.columbia.edu...
| Mary Reagan wrote:

| Favorite 2003 books:
|
| The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid

So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I bought
two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl lately.. :)

Did you meet the author (Moira Maus) at B'con? The woman is fearless - quite
brave of her to go on that monster rollercoaster ride with Ali and his pal!.
;o)

Annie
Mary Reagan
2003-12-23 19:41:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
|
| The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I bought
two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl lately.. :)
Did you meet the author (Moira Maus) at B'con? The woman is fearless - quite
brave of her to go on that monster rollercoaster ride with Ali and his pal!.
;o)
Annie
Yeah, Moira is wonderful and far braver than me. I was around when they
were trying to round up volunteers for the ride. No way in hell you would
get me on that. I'm fearless when it comes to planes (and I've been in some
fairly small ones with crazy pilots - myself included) but amusement park
rides scare the hell out of me.

Mary
vj
2003-12-23 20:11:07 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
<***@ldeo.columbia.edu> :

]No way in hell you would
]get me on that. I'm fearless when it comes to planes (and I've been in some
]fairly small ones with crazy pilots - myself included) but amusement park
]rides scare the hell out of me.

now that, i just do NOT understand!!!!!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Melissa
2003-12-23 20:47:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
]No way in hell you would
]get me on that. I'm fearless when it comes to planes (and I've been in some
]fairly small ones with crazy pilots - myself included) but amusement park
]rides scare the hell out of me.
now that, i just do NOT understand!!!!!
I know. People are funny that way. We have this (crazy) friend who drag
races, chases down people who wrong him on the road.... once he was attacked
by an ex boyfriend of the girl he was seeing at the time, and beat the guy
to a pulp. When the police arrived, they mistakenly wanted to take HIM away
as the intruder. When they went to court, the aforementioned assailant
looked at him the wrong way and he smashed him in the face. Okay, so this is
not a reticent kind of guy, right? But he refuses to go hot air ballooning.
Says it's dangerous.

Melissa (has gone hot-air ballooning about 6 times and LOVES it)
vj
2003-12-23 20:54:36 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from "Melissa"
<***@alumni.utexasGOHORNS.net> :

]I know. People are funny that way.

have you seen the commercial on TV - the one with the two guys? looks
like they're in sleeping bags, just talking.

ever ride a motorcycle? nah - those things are dangerous.

every go hang gliding? nah - you could get killed.

and on through several "sports".

and then the camera starts backing up . . . and they're half-way up a
cliff . . .


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Melissa
2003-12-23 22:38:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from "Melissa"
]I know. People are funny that way.
have you seen the commercial on TV - the one with the two guys? looks
like they're in sleeping bags, just talking.
ever ride a motorcycle? nah - those things are dangerous.
every go hang gliding? nah - you could get killed.
and on through several "sports".
and then the camera starts backing up . . . and they're half-way up a
cliff . . .
YES, I saw it today and Mike made the comments I did about our friend. Heh.

Melissa
vj
2003-12-23 22:44:47 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from "Melissa"
<***@alumni.utexasGOHORNS.net> :

]YES, I saw it today and Mike made the comments I did about our friend. Heh.

see what happens when you stay home?
you catch up on all KINDS of stuff!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Melissa
2003-12-24 00:45:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from "Melissa"
]YES, I saw it today and Mike made the comments I did about our friend. Heh.
see what happens when you stay home?
you catch up on all KINDS of stuff!
It's frightening, actually.
Melissa
vj
2003-12-24 00:50:49 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from "Melissa"
<***@alumni.utexasGOHORNS.net> :

]> see what happens when you stay home?
]> you catch up on all KINDS of stuff!
]
]It's frightening, actually.

point!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Mary Reagan
2003-12-23 20:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Melissa
Post by vj
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
]No way in hell you would
]get me on that. I'm fearless when it comes to planes (and I've been in
some
Post by vj
]fairly small ones with crazy pilots - myself included) but amusement park
]rides scare the hell out of me.
now that, i just do NOT understand!!!!!
I know. People are funny that way. We have this (crazy) friend who drag
races, chases down people who wrong him on the road.... once he was attacked
by an ex boyfriend of the girl he was seeing at the time, and beat the guy
to a pulp. When the police arrived, they mistakenly wanted to take HIM away
as the intruder. When they went to court, the aforementioned assailant
looked at him the wrong way and he smashed him in the face. Okay, so this is
not a reticent kind of guy, right? But he refuses to go hot air ballooning.
Says it's dangerous.
Melissa (has gone hot-air ballooning about 6 times and LOVES it)
Have you seen the commercial about the two guys talking about different
activities and how they won't do them because they are too dangerous. When
the camera pulls back you see that they are mountain climbers who are
strapped into sleeping bags hanging from the side of the mountain.

Mary
vj
2003-12-23 20:56:32 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
<***@ldeo.columbia.edu> :

]Have you seen the commercial about the two guys talking about different
]activities and how they won't do them because they are too dangerous. When
]the camera pulls back you see that they are mountain climbers who are
]strapped into sleeping bags hanging from the side of the mountain.

ROTFLOL!
great minds, and all that!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Mary Reagan
2003-12-23 23:10:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
]Have you seen the commercial about the two guys talking about different
]activities and how they won't do them because they are too dangerous. When
]the camera pulls back you see that they are mountain climbers who are
]strapped into sleeping bags hanging from the side of the mountain.
ROTFLOL!
great minds, and all that!
-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Definitely.

Mary
Cheryl Perkins
2003-12-23 22:27:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Mary Reagan
]No way in hell you would
]get me on that. I'm fearless when it comes to planes (and I've been in some
]fairly small ones with crazy pilots - myself included) but amusement park
]rides scare the hell out of me.
now that, i just do NOT understand!!!!!
Amusement park rides, unlike most planes, appear to be constructed,
maintained and run by people who could not get any other job, and whose
main qualification appears to be that they might be more or less sober at
the moment.

Cheryl (not a fan of amusement park rides)
vj
2003-12-23 23:29:21 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Cheryl Perkins
<***@mun.ca> :

]Amusement park rides, unlike most planes, appear to be constructed,
]maintained and run by people who could not get any other job, and whose
]main qualification appears to be that they might be more or less sober at
]the moment.

point!

but in a plane, you're so much HIGHER off of the ground!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Cheryl Perkins
2003-12-24 11:25:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
but in a plane, you're so much HIGHER off of the ground!
Actually, I find planes scarier the closer they get to the ground.

When they're up, they are just boring, aside from the inevitable thoughts
of whether you'll die from a blood clot caused by being unable to move, or
merely by suffocation.

Take-offs and landings, now, are another story. There was, and probably
still is, one type of commercial jet which on landing, immediately put all
its engines in reverse, causing an enormous racket, and making me wonder
how close we were to crashing into the terminal building if it took this
much effort to slow us down.

Cheryl
Chris
2003-12-24 12:29:16 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 11:25:30 +0000 (UTC), Cheryl Perkins
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by vj
but in a plane, you're so much HIGHER off of the ground!
Actually, I find planes scarier the closer they get to the ground.
When they're up, they are just boring, aside from the inevitable thoughts
of whether you'll die from a blood clot caused by being unable to move, or
merely by suffocation.
Take-offs and landings, now, are another story. There was, and probably
still is, one type of commercial jet which on landing, immediately put all
its engines in reverse, causing an enormous racket, and making me wonder
how close we were to crashing into the terminal building if it took this
much effort to slow us down.
Cheryl
The most dangerous part of flying they say is during takeoffs and
landings. That's when the most accidents occur. And that's when I have
a white-knuckled grip on the armrests. I agree, when you're up in the
air, the ride is boring; that's why they serve alcohol.

I remember when I was ten and flew from Frankfurt to Chicago with a
layover in London (sans parents) in a prop driven aircraft. No
movies, no alcohol, and I wasn't into reading mystery books yet. Talk
about a l-o-n-g and boring ride.

Chris
Fran Read
2003-12-24 15:18:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
The most dangerous part of flying they say is during takeoffs and
landings. That's when the most accidents occur. And that's when I have
a white-knuckled grip on the armrests. I agree, when you're up in the
air, the ride is boring; that's why they serve alcohol.
I remember when I was ten and flew from Frankfurt to Chicago with a
layover in London (sans parents) in a prop driven aircraft. No
movies, no alcohol, and I wasn't into reading mystery books yet. Talk
about a l-o-n-g and boring ride.
Chris
A friend told me the other evening that a few years ago she was on a flight
where one of the flight attendants was still standing when the plane took
off. The poor girl was flung from one end of the aisle to the other and had
several broken bones. I'm glad I didn't know this before my holiday! I
lost count of how many flights Julie and I took this year but was always
grateful that neither of us experienced any fear. Cramps, swollen feet,
boredom...
Fran
Mary Reagan
2003-12-24 16:36:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 11:25:30 +0000 (UTC), Cheryl Perkins
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by vj
but in a plane, you're so much HIGHER off of the ground!
Actually, I find planes scarier the closer they get to the ground.
When they're up, they are just boring, aside from the inevitable thoughts
of whether you'll die from a blood clot caused by being unable to move, or
merely by suffocation.
Take-offs and landings, now, are another story. There was, and probably
still is, one type of commercial jet which on landing, immediately put all
its engines in reverse, causing an enormous racket, and making me wonder
how close we were to crashing into the terminal building if it took this
much effort to slow us down.
Cheryl
The most dangerous part of flying they say is during takeoffs and
landings. That's when the most accidents occur. And that's when I have
a white-knuckled grip on the armrests. I agree, when you're up in the
air, the ride is boring; that's why they serve alcohol.
I remember when I was ten and flew from Frankfurt to Chicago with a
layover in London (sans parents) in a prop driven aircraft. No
movies, no alcohol, and I wasn't into reading mystery books yet. Talk
about a l-o-n-g and boring ride.
Chris
I remember when I first soloed. I was okay on the takeoff but once I got in
the air I realized that I also had to land the plane.

Mary
Pogonip
2003-12-24 19:41:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
Post by Chris
On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 11:25:30 +0000 (UTC), Cheryl Perkins
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by vj
but in a plane, you're so much HIGHER off of the ground!
Actually, I find planes scarier the closer they get to the ground.
When they're up, they are just boring, aside from the inevitable thoughts
of whether you'll die from a blood clot caused by being unable to move, or
merely by suffocation.
Take-offs and landings, now, are another story. There was, and probably
still is, one type of commercial jet which on landing, immediately put all
its engines in reverse, causing an enormous racket, and making me wonder
how close we were to crashing into the terminal building if it took this
much effort to slow us down.
Cheryl
The most dangerous part of flying they say is during takeoffs and
landings. That's when the most accidents occur. And that's when I have
a white-knuckled grip on the armrests. I agree, when you're up in the
air, the ride is boring; that's why they serve alcohol.
I remember when I was ten and flew from Frankfurt to Chicago with a
layover in London (sans parents) in a prop driven aircraft. No
movies, no alcohol, and I wasn't into reading mystery books yet. Talk
about a l-o-n-g and boring ride.
Chris
I remember when I first soloed. I was okay on the takeoff but once I got in
the air I realized that I also had to land the plane.
Mary
I hate flying anymore. I don't take well to being shut in
to confined areas - elevators and tunnels are on my bad
list. But I had to fly last June, and found that takeoff
still gives me a thrill - and I rate pilots on their
landings. ;-) I also like a little turbulence.
Otherwise, it's like being in a Greyhound or a subway car.

Earlier in life, I spent a lot of time in aircraft of
various types - many prop engine planes from 65 hp on up,
then some jets, seaplanes, helicopters. I think that I
have used up most of my flying luck. But there is still
nothing like the feeling of takeoff, and the jets do it so
well. Happy landings to everyone.
--
Joanne @ stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us
http://members.tripod.com/~bernardschopen/
Life is about the journey, not about the destination.
Mary Reagan
2003-12-27 00:57:11 UTC
Permalink
Okay, I've got another book to add to my favorite list for 2003. Finally got
around to reading Monkeewrench by PJ Tracy. I've got to say, for a first
outing its a great read. Hell, even without taking into account that its
their first book its great. I couldn't put it down.

Mary
Bridget
2003-12-27 05:13:22 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Dec 2003 19:57:11 -0500, Mary Reagan
Post by Mary Reagan
Okay, I've got another book to add to my favorite list for 2003. Finally got
around to reading Monkeewrench by PJ Tracy. I've got to say, for a first
outing its a great read. Hell, even without taking into account that its
their first book its great. I couldn't put it down.
Mary
Grrreat...That's one I just sent back the library unread.
Rethinking things here.
B.
Cheryl Perkins
2003-12-24 19:18:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
I remember when I first soloed. I was okay on the takeoff but once I got in
the air I realized that I also had to land the plane.
Might I suggest the time to realize this would be *before* you take off?

Cheryl
Mary Reagan
2003-12-27 00:47:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by Mary Reagan
I remember when I first soloed. I was okay on the takeoff but once I got in
the air I realized that I also had to land the plane.
Might I suggest the time to realize this would be *before* you take off?
Cheryl
Yeah, I guess that would have been the smart thing to do. Its just that my
instructor didn't give me much chance to think about it. We had been doing
touch and go's for almost an hour. On our last one he had me stop the plane
on our way to park it. He got out and told me I could either try one on my
own or take the plane back. Of course, he said everyone would know that I
had chickened out if I just brought the plane back.

So of course I caved. But once I got over that first feeling of dread it was
fantastic.

Mary
vj
2003-12-28 03:48:38 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Cheryl Perkins
<***@mun.ca> :

]> I remember when I first soloed. I was okay on the takeoff but once I got in
]> the air I realized that I also had to land the plane.
]
]Might I suggest the time to realize this would be *before* you take off?

POINT!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Jeremy
2003-12-28 06:05:31 UTC
Permalink
I am going to take this beyond books and into music and movies because this thread has gotten me thinking about best of the year.Of course I will think of more as soon as I post this.
Jeremy
Books(in no order):
Burn by Sean Doolittle. Not sure what I can say that has not already been said.
Burning Moon by Richard Barre. A good book made more special because of Richard's hiatus from writing
Altered Carbon by Richard Morgan. Fantastic future sci-fi crime novel.
The Guards by Ken Bruen. In a word: WOW!
Every Secret Place by Laura Lippman. Touching, very real characters make this one to remember.
I realize that the last two were published first in the U.K. but came out here in 03.

Music: 2003 was filled with a lot of disappointing releases for me. Several artists, that I am a big fan of, put out new albums. Most of these were, in my opinion, lukewarm at best. There were some good ones:
Shine by Daniel Lanois. Lanois released his first solo album in ten years and it is a sonic feast! Lanois is a Grammy award winning producer of U2, Peter Gabriel, Bob Dylan and others.
We Have Come For You All by Anthrax. The best album Anthrax has put out in over a decade. Powerful with some very strong lyrics. Best metal album of 2003.
Urban Cave by Brother. A sonic treat that challenges my senses. They incorporate musical instruments that are not common in pop music and make it work. Who ever thought bagpipes could be fun and festive? Many thanks to Jen and Dianne for opening my ears and eyes to this band.
Remember The Motto(Live in Toronto June 11, 2003) by Ozzy Osbourne. In the middle of the SARS scare, when other performers were canceling their Toronto appearances, Ozzy Osbourne went there and played a show that clocked in at 167 minutes. Ozzy live is not the man from The Osbournes show on MTV. Ozzy pulled out all stops and gave a blistering performance that featured Zakk Wylde(long time Ozzy guitarist) former Faith No More drummer Mike Bordin and ex-Metallica bassist Jason Newsted. This three disc set captures the entire wild, fun performance by the Prince of Darkness.
Leona Naess by Leona Naess. Delightful release by this singer/songwriter. Less commercial sounding than her previous efforts but stronger lyrically.

Movies:
Mystic River.....holy shit. Penn, Robbins, Linney and Harden all deserve Oscar nominations for this one.
Identity. Some loved it, some hated it. I fall into the former category.
Love Actually. This struck the romantic in me. As much of the world saddens me with it's behavior, this movie made me remember how wonderful human beings can be.
Lost In Translation. Bill Murray is incredible in this one.
Pirates of The Caribbean. For one reason only: Johnny Depp. His performance was one of my favs of the year.
razz
2003-12-28 09:47:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeremy
The Guards by Ken Bruen. In a word: WOW!
I read this recently and I was impressed by it, too. Someone here
described it as 'not strictly mystery' and I agree. However, it whetted
my appetite for more of his work. I don't know where he's going, but it
could be an interesting journey.

Razz
Jennifer Jordan
2003-12-28 14:21:20 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 00:05:31 -0600, "Jeremy"
<***@comcastnofreakinspam.net> wrote:

"I am going to take this beyond books and into music and movies
because this thread has gotten me thinking about best of the year.Of
course I will think of more as soon as I post this.
" Jeremy

So many amazing books in no order:
Burn by Sean Doolittle
Every Secret Place by Laura Lippman
Mission Flats by William Landy
Bad Men by John Connolly
10 Little Indians by Sherman Alexie
Lost Souls by Michael Collins
Chapter & Verse by Colin Bateman(laughed my ass off)
Hummingbird Wizard by Meredith Blevens(this book surprised me)
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach
Midnight Pass by Stuart Kaminsky

Music in no order:
Urban Cave by Brother
O by Damien Rice
1972 by Josh Rouse
Black Cherry by Goldfrapp
On and On by Jack Johnson
Keep On Your Mean Side by the Kills (thanks you MrE)
East Mountain South by East Mountain South
Human by Nitin Sawhney
and I was ecstatic to receive the Johnny Cash box set from my mommy
for Christmas.

Movies:

Lost In Translation. Bill Murray is incredible in this one.
Pirates of The Caribbean. For one reason only: Johnny Depp.

I am a loser that hasn't seen many movies.

Now, I am going to be a loser that goes and gets a cup of steaming
java.

Jen
Jeremy
2003-12-28 14:44:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jennifer Jordan
On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 00:05:31 -0600, "Jeremy"
"I am going to take this beyond books and into music and movies
because this thread has gotten me thinking about best of the year.Of
course I will think of more as soon as I post this.
" Jeremy
Burn by Sean Doolittle
Every Secret Place by Laura Lippman
Mission Flats by William Landy
Bad Men by John Connolly
10 Little Indians by Sherman Alexie
Lost Souls by Michael Collins
Chapter & Verse by Colin Bateman(laughed my ass off)
Hummingbird Wizard by Meredith Blevens(this book surprised me)
Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers by Mary Roach
Midnight Pass by Stuart Kaminsky
Jen
ARGGHHH! I forgot Alexie and Connolly! Those two are to be included
on my list as well.
Jeremy
Chris
2003-12-28 15:49:41 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 00:05:31 -0600, "Jeremy"
Post by Jeremy
I am going to take this beyond books and into music and movies because this thread has gotten me thinking about best of the year.
Jeremy
Burning Moon by Richard Barre. A good book made more special because of Richard's hiatus from writing
Delighted to finally know of someone else on RAM that has read and
enjoyed _Burning Moon_. It was too long of a wait for this 5th
installament of the Hardesty series. I understand that Barre has a
stand-alone coming out in Spring '04. Looking forward to reading it.
I'm hoping he does a book tour and that it will bring him to my neck
of the woods.
Post by Jeremy
Pirates of The Caribbean. For one reason only: Johnny Depp. His performance was one of my favs of the year.
I don't consider myself a big fan of Johnny Depp's, but I agree, his
performance was the best part of the movie. The movie itself was okay.
We went to a 'brew and view' to see it - a theatre that serves
alcohol and food during the movie. It was an interesting experience,
but not something I would do on a regular basis. The waiters walking
around serving food was a distraction for me. Give me a bag of
buttered popcorn and a Diet Coke and I'm happy.


Chris
Jeremy
2003-12-28 17:14:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jennifer Jordan
On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 00:05:31 -0600, "Jeremy"
Post by Jeremy
I am going to take this beyond books and into music and movies because
this thread has gotten me thinking about best of the year.
Post by Jennifer Jordan
Post by Jeremy
Jeremy
Burning Moon by Richard Barre. A good book made more special because of
Richard's hiatus from writing
Post by Jennifer Jordan
Delighted to finally know of someone else on RAM that has read and
enjoyed _Burning Moon_. It was too long of a wait for this 5th
installament of the Hardesty series. I understand that Barre has a
stand-alone coming out in Spring '04. Looking forward to reading it.
I'm hoping he does a book tour and that it will bring him to my neck
of the woods.
Post by Jeremy
Pirates of The Caribbean. For one reason only: Johnny Depp. His
performance was one of my favs of the year.
Post by Jennifer Jordan
I don't consider myself a big fan of Johnny Depp's, but I agree, his
performance was the best part of the movie. The movie itself was okay.
We went to a 'brew and view' to see it - a theatre that serves
alcohol and food during the movie. It was an interesting experience,
but not something I would do on a regular basis. The waiters walking
around serving food was a distraction for me. Give me a bag of
buttered popcorn and a Diet Coke and I'm happy.
Chris
I can think of more than a few movies that would have been helped by the
consumption of alcohol. Actually, I think some of these same movies were
made while large qualities of alcohol were consumed on the set.
Jeremy
Donna
2003-12-28 20:15:01 UTC
Permalink
Hi All,

Well, I'm now back home and on my usual server, so that means I can
catch up on all the posts I missed by being on a temporary one which
decided to let me only see half of them.
Post by Jeremy
I am going to take this beyond books and into music and movies
oh goodie :o)

I've already done my books list, so won't repeat it. Oh, what the heck,
I'll repeat it and make it longer :o)


Eddie Muller - The Distance
Eddie Muller - Shadow Boxer
David Corbett - Done For A Dime
Barbara Seranella - Unpaid Dues
Ken Bruen - Killing of The Tinkers
Ken Bruen - The White Trilogy
Bill Fitzhugh - Heart Seizure
Joe Lansdale - A Fine Dark Line
John Baker - The Meanest Flood
Stuart Pawson - Limestone Cowboy

which were my only 5 rated reads of the year

and my 4.75 rated reads:

Robert Ferrigno - Scavenger Hunt
Simon Kernick - The Murder Exchange
Mark Billingham - Lazybones
Paula Woods - Inner City Blues
Sean Doolittle - Dirt
G M Ford - Fury
Denise Hamilton - Sugar Skull
Steve Brewer - Fool's Paradise
Post by Jeremy
Music: 2003 was filled with a lot of disappointing releases for me.
I, on the other hand, bought some wonderful new releases, my favourites
being:

The Kills - Keep on Your Mean Side
Muse - Absolution
The Distillers - Coral Fang
The Strokes - Room on Fire

as well as Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, The Coral, Kings of Leon.

New discoveries who I haven't bought stuff by yet:
Aerial Love Feed
Sea Ray
Sons and Daughters

And my very best musical discovery - WOXY
Post by Jeremy
Pirates of The Caribbean. For one reason only: Johnny Depp. His
performance was one of my favs of the year.
i loved this one too. And it had the extra added attraction of Orlando
Bloom, who also, and completely coincidentally, featured in my other
favourite film of the year - Return of The King.

Tata,

Donna
--
http://freespace.virgin.net/donna.moore
vj
2003-12-28 20:23:01 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Donna
<***@yahahahhahahaaaooooo.com> :

]Return of The King

saw it this weekend.
covered my eyes when it was time for the spider and through a couple
of the battle scenes.
awesome movie.


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Jeremy
2003-12-29 00:18:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Donna
Post by Jeremy
Pirates of The Caribbean. For one reason only: Johnny Depp. His
performance was one of my favs of the year.
i loved this one too. And it had the extra added attraction of Orlando
Bloom, who also, and completely coincidentally, featured in my other
favourite film of the year - Return of The King.
Tata,
Donna
I have to say that I don't get the hoopla about Bloom. The guy has next to
no real presence or charisma. I understand that ladies find him nice to look
at, but how about a little personality to go with it?
Jeremy
Cheryl Perkins
2003-12-29 00:24:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeremy
I have to say that I don't get the hoopla about Bloom. The guy has next to
no real presence or charisma. I understand that ladies find him nice to look
at, but how about a little personality to go with it?
Look, with that face and hair and elf getup, he doesn't *need* charisma
for many women, although personally I prefer whatsisname, Aragorn.

Cheryl, not usually good at connecting names and faces
vj
2003-12-29 01:11:07 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Cheryl Perkins
<***@mun.ca> :

]Look, with that face and hair and elf getup, he doesn't *need* charisma
]for many women, although personally I prefer whatsisname, Aragorn.

even Johnny said he was the "prettiest" straight male he'd ever seen.
and elves ARE supposed to be "pretty".

but yes, Aragon DOES clean up nice, doesn't he??? **grin**


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Jeremy
2003-12-29 04:48:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by Jeremy
I have to say that I don't get the hoopla about Bloom. The guy has next to
no real presence or charisma. I understand that ladies find him nice to look
at, but how about a little personality to go with it?
Look, with that face and hair and elf getup, he doesn't *need* charisma
for many women, although personally I prefer whatsisname, Aragorn.
Cheryl, not usually good at connecting names and faces
So what you are saying is that Mr. Bloom is little more
than a blow up doll? Well, that is a ringing endorsement for future career
security.I can certainly see how wearing little green tights could help a
person go a long ways, just look at Sandy Duncan. Maybe Bloom can sell wheat
thins.

Jeremy
Pogonip
2003-12-29 05:26:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeremy
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by Jeremy
I have to say that I don't get the hoopla about Bloom. The guy has next
to
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by Jeremy
no real presence or charisma. I understand that ladies find him nice to
look
Post by Cheryl Perkins
Post by Jeremy
at, but how about a little personality to go with it?
Look, with that face and hair and elf getup, he doesn't *need* charisma
for many women, although personally I prefer whatsisname, Aragorn.
Cheryl, not usually good at connecting names and faces
So what you are saying is that Mr. Bloom is little more
than a blow up doll? Well, that is a ringing endorsement for future career
security.I can certainly see how wearing little green tights could help a
person go a long ways, just look at Sandy Duncan. Maybe Bloom can sell wheat
thins.
Jeremy
Hey, Cheryl, how come Jeremy doesn't want us to have eye
candy? Guys are always drooling over girls with the
brains of blow-up dolls, why can't we have ours? Not that
I am saying Orlando Bloom is an airhead....frankly, I
don't know! Plus it doesn't matter since I wasn't
figuring on taking him to raise....just window shopping.

What you got against Wheat Thins, Jeremy?
--
Joanne @ stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us
http://members.tripod.com/~bernardschopen/
Life is about the journey, not about the destination.
vj
2003-12-29 05:33:02 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Pogonip <***@nowhere.org>
:

]Hey, Cheryl, how come Jeremy doesn't want us to have eye
]candy? Guys are always drooling over girls with the
]brains of blow-up dolls, why can't we have ours? Not that
]I am saying Orlando Bloom is an airhead....frankly, I
]don't know! Plus it doesn't matter since I wasn't
]figuring on taking him to raise....just window shopping.
]
]What you got against Wheat Thins, Jeremy?

seconded. i want to know, too!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Cheryl Perkins
2003-12-29 11:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeremy
So what you are saying is that Mr. Bloom is little more
than a blow up doll? Well, that is a ringing endorsement for future career
security.I can certainly see how wearing little green tights could help a
person go a long ways, just look at Sandy Duncan. Maybe Bloom can sell wheat
thins.
There are times when you want someone with a few brains who can carry on a
decent conversation once in a while, and there are times when all you want
is a pretty face.

Anyway, I like wheat thins.

Cheryl

Sarah Weinman
2003-12-29 00:22:58 UTC
Permalink
I have to pass on movies and music b/c the former, I barely saw any
this year (and most of it was idle trash since I get dragged to movies
w. friends much of the time) and the latter b/c I'm hopelessly lazy
and don't buy/download stuff.

Books, there's just too damned many to list, and luckily most of my
faves made it on January's BEST OF or GIFT BOOKS list, but I'll
mention a few anyway:

Laura Lippman's EVERY SECRET THING for being a literary novel with one
hell of a plot.

Jules Hardy's MISTER CANDID for the same reason, also because it
skirts some seriously nasty taboos and teeters on the edge of being
over-the-top without ever going over. Having also read her first
novel, ALTERED LAND, I can safely say that she's got a wonderfully
bright future ahead of her, and her prose is absolutely beautiful,
whether in a more languid literary approach or in thriller mode.

Babs Horton's A JARFUL OF ANGELS for also doing the literary/crime
thing and taking me back to my childhood of reading Lucy Maud
Montgomery's wonderful books about childhood friendships. I can't wait
for her next book, which isn't a crime novel but looks to be just as
beautifully written as this book was.

Steve Hamilton's BLOOD IS THE SKY for the scene in the woods, for a
major leap forward in the series, and for just being a flat-out good
book.

Martyn Waites' BORN UNDER PUNCHES because it made me laugh, cry, and
featured some phenomenally lyrical writing. And maybe because I was a
minority voice in loving the book while others panned it, but I'm
stubborn that way.

William Landay's MISSION FLATS for being the best debut I read all
year, and for the ending.

John Connolly's BAD MEN, for being a Western and a damned good one
too. And yes, you read it right, it's a Western in structure and
archetype, that supernatural stuff is all window-dressing.

In terms of reissues and oldies, Dorothy B. Hughes' IN A LONELY PLACE
for being ahead of her time, Roger L. Simon's Moses Wine novels
because they are so funny and politically charged, Thomas Perry's THE
BUTCHER'S BOY and METZGER'S DOG for being fantastic thrillers that are
wonderfully intelligent, and the collected works of Ross Thomas
because he's my favorite mystery writer.

And turning away from the genre, Sherman Alexie's TEN LITTLE INDIANS
for the reasons Jeremy and Jen gave, Neal Pollack's NEVER MIND THE
POLLACKS for its gleefully insane satire of rock criticism, Tracy
Chevalier's THE LADY AND THE UNICORN because it affirms why she's
become one of my very favorite writers, and though it wasn't published
this year, Elizabeth Smart's BY GRAND CENTRAL STATION I SAT DOWN AND
WEPT because it tore my guts out and wrenched my heart. (and Rosemary
Sullivan's biography of Smart is a wonderful work as well and worth
hunting for.)

And finally, Steve Almond's MY LIFE IN HEAVY METAL, which I reread
over and over and over and never get tired of the stories. Women
should read it to understand men. Men should read it to understand
themselves. I freaking love this book.

Sarah

Confessions of an Idiosyncratic Mind:
http://sarahweinman.blogspot.com

sarah AT weinmans DOT com
Annie C
2003-12-23 20:23:15 UTC
Permalink
"Mary Reagan" <***@ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote in message news:BC0E04B6.2C301%***@ldeo.columbia.edu...
| Annie C wrote:
|
| >
| > "Mary Reagan" <***@ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote in message
| > news:BC0DF3EA.2C2C9%***@ldeo.columbia.edu...
| > | Mary Reagan wrote:
| >
| > | Favorite 2003 books:
| > |
| > | The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
| >
| > So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I
bought
| > two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl
lately.. :)
| >
| > Did you meet the author (Moira Maus) at B'con? The woman is fearless -
quite
| > brave of her to go on that monster rollercoaster ride with Ali and his
pal!.
| > ;o)
| >
| > Annie
| >
| >
|
|
| Yeah, Moira is wonderful and far braver than me. I was around when they
| were trying to round up volunteers for the ride. No way in hell you would
| get me on that. I'm fearless when it comes to planes (and I've been in
some
| fairly small ones with crazy pilots - myself included) but amusement park
| rides scare the hell out of me.
|
| Mary

Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.

Annie
|
Jr@Ease
2003-12-23 20:37:07 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:23:15 -0600, "Annie C"
Post by Annie C
Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
Annie
I like rollercoasters, because they are linear in their movement.
Rides that spin are circular, and make me dizzy, and as far as I'm
concerned, if I want vertigo, there are drugs I can take to create the
effect.

John P
Annie C
2003-12-24 01:21:55 UTC
Permalink
"***@Ease" <***@this.address> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
| On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:23:15 -0600, "Annie C"
| <***@mindspring.com> wrote:
|
| >Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
| >Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
| >..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
| >
| >Annie
|
| I like rollercoasters, because they are linear in their movement.
| Rides that spin are circular, and make me dizzy, and as far as I'm
| concerned, if I want vertigo, there are drugs I can take to create the
| effect.
|
| John P
|

Hmm, rollercoasters do not feel straight/ linear to me- unless you mean
going straight up ^ and then straight down | screaming all the way.. Linear
is, uh, like riding on a train.. pretty much a straight line.. with few
surprises. And then some r-coasters incorporate loops.. so that's the
circular bit.. Pass me those anti-anxiety drugs, John ;o)

Another thing that's odd is that while I have no fear of flying (and always
request a window seat), I do have a big-time fear of heights. Like the time
my knees literally locked from the terror of being on an observation deck of
CN tower in Toronto! I actually needed help to get out of there.. Never
been to the top of the Sears Tower here .. But the 'idea' of parasailing
doesn't bother me..but I've not tried it yet either ;) As I said, it's
mighty strange.

Annie
Jr@Ease
2003-12-24 01:42:40 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 19:21:55 -0600, "Annie C"
Post by Annie C
| On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:23:15 -0600, "Annie C"
|
| >Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
| >Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
| >..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
| >
| >Annie
|
| I like rollercoasters, because they are linear in their movement.
| Rides that spin are circular, and make me dizzy, and as far as I'm
| concerned, if I want vertigo, there are drugs I can take to create the
| effect.
|
| John P
|
Hmm, rollercoasters do not feel straight/ linear to me- unless you mean
going straight up ^ and then straight down | screaming all the way..
Yea. That's it. Linear in the sense that it's moving in a line, as
opposed to a circle. Short circles over and over again make my stomach
heave. I couldn't even get on those little merry-go-rounds on the
playground when I was ...ahem...younger.
Post by Annie C
Linear
is, uh, like riding on a train.. pretty much a straight line.. with few
surprises. And then some r-coasters incorporate loops.. so that's the
circular bit.. Pass me those anti-anxiety drugs, John ;o)
I've got a prescription. We'll share. :)
Post by Annie C
Another thing that's odd is that while I have no fear of flying (and always
request a window seat), I do have a big-time fear of heights. Like the time
my knees literally locked from the terror of being on an observation deck of
CN tower in Toronto! I actually needed help to get out of there.. Never
been to the top of the Sears Tower here .. But the 'idea' of parasailing
doesn't bother me..but I've not tried it yet either ;) As I said, it's
mighty strange.
Annie
Most of that wouldn't bother me, And I could jump out of a plane with
a parachute too (haven't yet), but going around in circles - no way.

John P
Annie C
2003-12-24 01:45:28 UTC
Permalink
"***@Ease" <***@this.address.com> wrote in
message news:***@4ax.com...
| On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 19:21:55 -0600, "Annie C"
|
|
| >Another thing that's odd is that while I have no fear of flying (and
always
| >request a window seat), I do have a big-time fear of heights. Like the
time
| >my knees literally locked from the terror of being on an observation deck
of
| >CN tower in Toronto! I actually needed help to get out of there.. Never
| >been to the top of the Sears Tower here .. But the 'idea' of parasailing
| >doesn't bother me..but I've not tried it yet either ;) As I said, it's
| >mighty strange.
| >
| >Annie
| >
|
| Most of that wouldn't bother me, And I could jump out of a plane with
| a parachute too (haven't yet), but going around in circles - no way.
|
| John P

Guess we'll sit out our turn on the tilt-a-whirl then...!
Oy.

Annie
turning pale just thinking about that ride....
pass me the meds quick!. ;)
Mary Reagan
2003-12-24 01:54:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
| On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:23:15 -0600, "Annie C"
|
| >Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
| >Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
| >..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
| >
| >Annie
|
| I like rollercoasters, because they are linear in their movement.
| Rides that spin are circular, and make me dizzy, and as far as I'm
| concerned, if I want vertigo, there are drugs I can take to create the
| effect.
|
| John P
|
Hmm, rollercoasters do not feel straight/ linear to me- unless you mean
going straight up ^ and then straight down | screaming all the way.. Linear
is, uh, like riding on a train.. pretty much a straight line.. with few
surprises. And then some r-coasters incorporate loops.. so that's the
circular bit.. Pass me those anti-anxiety drugs, John ;o)
Another thing that's odd is that while I have no fear of flying (and always
request a window seat), I do have a big-time fear of heights. Like the time
my knees literally locked from the terror of being on an observation deck of
CN tower in Toronto! I actually needed help to get out of there.. Never
been to the top of the Sears Tower here .. But the 'idea' of parasailing
doesn't bother me..but I've not tried it yet either ;) As I said, it's
mighty strange.
Annie
Annie I think we were separated at birth.

Mary
Annie C
2003-12-24 02:02:01 UTC
Permalink
"Mary Reagan" <***@ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote in message news:BC0E5C1B.27294%***@ldeo.columbia.edu...
| Annie C wrote :
|
| >
| > "***@Ease" <***@this.address> wrote in message
| > news:***@4ax.com...
| > | On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 14:23:15 -0600, "Annie C"
| > | <***@mindspring.com> wrote:
| > |
| > | >Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
| > | >Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
| > | >..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
| > | >
| > | >Annie
| > |
| > | I like rollercoasters, because they are linear in their movement.
| > | Rides that spin are circular, and make me dizzy, and as far as I'm
| > | concerned, if I want vertigo, there are drugs I can take to create the
| > | effect.
| > |
| > | John P
| > |
| >
| > Hmm, rollercoasters do not feel straight/ linear to me- unless you mean
| > going straight up ^ and then straight down | screaming all the way..
Linear
| > is, uh, like riding on a train.. pretty much a straight line.. with few
| > surprises. And then some r-coasters incorporate loops.. so that's the
| > circular bit.. Pass me those anti-anxiety drugs, John ;o)
| >
| > Another thing that's odd is that while I have no fear of flying (and
always
| > request a window seat), I do have a big-time fear of heights. Like the
time
| > my knees literally locked from the terror of being on an observation
deck of
| > CN tower in Toronto! I actually needed help to get out of there.. Never
| > been to the top of the Sears Tower here .. But the 'idea' of
parasailing
| > doesn't bother me..but I've not tried it yet either ;) As I said, it's
| > mighty strange.
| >
| > Annie
| >
| >
|
|
| Annie I think we were separated at birth.
|
| Mary
|

..and and.. we both love mysteries, calamari, and going to Tiffany's!
..more than just coincidence, I say..
Sis?!?

Annie ;o)
JillBr
2003-12-24 20:20:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
Another thing that's odd is that while I have no fear of flying (and
always
request a window seat), I do have a big-time fear of heights. Like the
time
my knees literally locked from the terror of being on an observation
deck of
CN tower in Toronto! I actually needed help to get out of there.
I'm similar, although I always try for an aisle seat (claustrophobia sets in
otherwise).

One time I foolishly let myself be talked into taking the ski lift up to the
top of Aspen Mountain. Right after starting up the panic set in. At the top I
had a full-blown panic attack, crying, sweating, etc. (and believe it or not,
I'm a pretty stable person so it was way out of character). I ended up begging
for the first aid snowmobile to take me back down, figuring that embarrassment
would beat spending the rest of my life at the top of that mountain and knowing
there was no way I was getting back on that lift.

Jill
JillBr
2003-12-24 17:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
I love flying and one of the best times I ever had was in an acrobatic plane
(loops, rolls, stalls, etc.). On the other hand, one of the joys of being a
grownup is that no one can ever force or humiliate me to get me to ride
something at an amusement park!

Jill
m***@aol.ccom
2003-12-23 21:52:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
Same with me..I love flying....though not as much in small planes.
Have always wanted to try para-sailing...looks fun ;).
..but rollercoasters and rides that spin and all that...uh-uh.
Annie
Oh, interesting. I've had a recurring nightmare for years in which I'm up on
the top of the mast of a boat, swaying from side to side, and it terrifies me.

I received a Christmas card from a co-worker which showed his GF and daughter
(who's five and clearly braver than I am) parasailing in Mexico. I told Scotty
about my dream and how the combination of boats + great heights scares the crap
out of me.

He suggested that I go parasailing as therapy. (What part of terrified did he
miss!?!)

Mary
vj
2003-12-23 21:55:42 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from ***@aol.ccom :

]He suggested that I go parasailing as therapy. (What part of terrified did he
]miss!?!)

exactly!
i've seen those parasailing commercials. and they look like SUCH fun.
but when i think of trying it myself, i have cold chills.


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Donna
2003-12-23 22:25:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by vj
i've seen those parasailing commercials. and they look like SUCH fun.
but when i think of trying it myself, i have cold chills.
I went parascending once and getting up there and being up there were
just great. It was the para-descending that sent me para-shitscared.
On 3 consecutive weekends I went parascending, abseiling and white water
rafting. On the 4th weekend I went to Glasgow's delightful Cleopatra's
nightclub (otherwise known as Clarty Pats). The nightclub was far, far
more terrifying than anything else.

Donna
--
http://freespace.virgin.net/donna.moore
vj
2003-12-23 22:31:06 UTC
Permalink
vj found this in rec.arts.mystery, from Donna
<***@yahahahhaoooo.com> :

]It was the para-descending that sent me para-shitscared.

ROTFLOL! point!


-----------
@vicki [SnuggleWench]
(Books) http://www.booksnbytes.com
(Jewelry) http://www.vickijean.com
-----------
It's not what you take, when you leave this world behind you;
it's what you leave behind you when you go. -- Randy Travis
Ali
2003-12-24 21:03:26 UTC
Permalink
Subject: Re: Favorite books from 2003
From: Mary Reagan
but amusement park
rides scare the hell out of me.
Mary
me too too!

Loading Image...
Pogonip
2003-12-24 21:17:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ali
Subject: Re: Favorite books from 2003
From: Mary Reagan
but amusement park
rides scare the hell out of me.
Mary
me too too!
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/grogular/vegas/images/126.jpg
You will not be standing in line for this new, planned Las
Vegas attraction?
Loading Image....php
--
Joanne @ stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us
http://members.tripod.com/~bernardschopen/
Life is about the journey, not about the destination.
Harvey R. Stone
2003-12-23 22:00:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
|
| The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I bought
two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl lately.. :)
Did you meet the author (Moira Maus) at B'con? The woman is fearless - quite
brave of her to go on that monster rollercoaster ride with Ali and his pal!.
;o)
Annie
Is this a UK book? Amazon US pretends there is no such book.
Phyl
Pogonip
2003-12-23 22:14:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harvey R. Stone
Is this a UK book? Amazon US pretends there is no such book.
Phyl
Shows up now, is a paperback at $6.99. Also 16 new and
used from $3.45.
--
Joanne @ stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us
http://members.tripod.com/~bernardschopen/
Life is about the journey, not about the destination.
Mary Reagan
2003-12-23 23:11:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pogonip
Post by Harvey R. Stone
Is this a UK book? Amazon US pretends there is no such book.
Phyl
Shows up now, is a paperback at $6.99. Also 16 new and
used from $3.45.
Its a paperback original. Was supposed to be released at the beginning of
December.

Mary
Annie C
2003-12-24 01:04:09 UTC
Permalink
"Harvey R. Stone" <***@swbell..net> wrote in message news:3W2Gb.663$***@newssvr24.news.prodigy.com...

| > | Mary Reagan wrote:
| >
| > | Favorite 2003 books:
| > |
| > | The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
| >
| > So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I
bought
| > two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl
lately..
| :)
| >
| > Did you meet the author (Moira Maus) at B'con? The woman is fearless -
| quite
| > brave of her to go on that monster rollercoaster ride with Ali and his
| pal!.
| > ;o)
| >
| > Annie
| >
| >
|
| Is this a UK book? Amazon US pretends there is no such book.
| Phyl
|

Both. It's a US paperback original..$6.99 It's there, I just looked it up.
Try looking up the title first: " The Last Victim In Glen Ross'.. The
author's name is *M.G. Kincaid* (Moira's pen name)

Oh, I just checked and it's also avail. on amazon UK with same release
date..also in paperback..£4.01

Annie
Mark Alan Miller
2003-12-28 18:27:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Annie C
|
| The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I bought
two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl lately.. :)
It is a delightful book. I was particularly impressed by how well-drawn the
various police officers are, especially Mornay and Claire Gillespie. The
collegial relationship between the moody Mornay and the more upbeat
Gillespie is very convincing, showing how two such different personalities
can work together and respect each other. I'm looking forward to the second
book anxiously.

Mark Alan Miller
Annie C
2003-12-29 03:46:52 UTC
Permalink
"Mark Alan Miller" <***@sfdiamondJUNK.com> wrote in message news:ggFHb.2950$***@newssvr25.news.prodigy.com...
|
| "Annie C" <***@mindspring.com> wrote in message
| news:***@news.bnb-lp.com...
| >
| > "Mary Reagan" <***@ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote in message
| > news:BC0DF3EA.2C2C9%***@ldeo.columbia.edu...
| > | Mary Reagan wrote:
| >
| > | Favorite 2003 books:
| > |
| > | The Last Victim in Glen Ross by MG Kincaid
| >
| > So anxious to read this! Waiting for amazon to deliver my copies, I
bought
| > two!..delayed again, deliveries from them have slowed to a crawl
lately..
| :)
|
| It is a delightful book. I was particularly impressed by how well-drawn
the
| various police officers are, especially Mornay and Claire Gillespie. The
| collegial relationship between the moody Mornay and the more upbeat
| Gillespie is very convincing, showing how two such different personalities
| can work together and respect each other. I'm looking forward to the
second
| book anxiously.
|
| Mark Alan Miller
|

So happy to hear these positive comments.. my order finally arrived Friday,
and I'll be starting it tonight! (Have been too busy to read for almost 5
days.. am anxious to do 'normal things' again, now that our well-fed guests
have all gone home ;) This should be a great start to a new reading year!..

Annie
Randy Money
2003-12-23 20:54:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
Now that the year is almost over I thought it would be a good time to put
together a list of RAMs favorite books from the past year. I already know
what's at the top of Ali's list, but I'm sure there will be some surprises.
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
I'm still working on my list.
Mary
That you have read five books from 2003 and another five from before
proves, I think, that you read a heck of a lot faster than I do.

Oh, well...

From 2003:
_The Two Sams_ by Glen Hirshberg
_Harry Potter and The Order of the Phoenix_ by J.K. Rowlings
_The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen_ by Alan Moore (w/Kevin O’Neill,
illustrator)

These are the only books I read from 2003 (and I'm not entirely sure
about the Moore). The first was the best, and the other two good fun.

From before 2003:
_I Married a Dead Man_ by Cornell Woolrich
_Hauntings_ by Vernon Lee (I'm cheating here; I only read 1/2 the book
and put the rest aside for later pleasure; but in its original edition
it only had four stories and I read all of those and they were excellent)
_The Invisible Man_ by H. G. Wells
_The Halloween Tree_ by Ray Bradbury
_The Red of His Shadow_ by Mayra Montero

That last and the Hirshberg would be my nominees for the very best books
I read this year. I think the Montero would nose out the Hirshberg,
though, if I was forced to choose just one.

Randy M.
Carol Schwaderer Dickinson
2003-12-26 09:11:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mary Reagan
1) What are your five favorite books that were published in 2003?
I'll let you know around 2006 when they hit the top of my TBR pile.
Post by Mary Reagan
2) Of the books that you read this year that were published before 2003,
what were your favorite five?
Hmmm.

Carol
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...